Close this Window

Course Title: Access to Justice in Civil Matters
Course Number: 1026
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This seminar will explore the extent to which the American legal system provides access to civil justice for people of low and moderate means. It considers traditional models of legal practice and their availability to people of low and middle incomes; innovative forms of legal assistance; and special barriers experienced by specific groups, such as non-English speakers. The focus will be on justice gaps and on current efforts and proposals for addressing them. Particular attention will be paid to statutes, regulations, and court decisions that, in one way or another, shape or help to ameliorate access to justice gaps.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Accounting for Lawyers
Course Number: 0570
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The course is designed to simplify the accounting process and instill confidence in students that they can handle situations where accounting and finances come into play. The course will explain the accounting process from original entry to the production of financial statements; it will critically examine evolving accounting standards and procedures; students will learn to analyze financial statements; the importance of the time value of money, and the various liabilities that will be of importance to them; and accounting problems. Finally, students will learn about accounting systems and the importance of internal control. The course is designed for students who have no previous study of accounting but who plan to engage in commercial, corporate, tax, or any legal practice where finances are an issue.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Administrative Law
Course Number: 0400
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
A study of the process of lawmaking and law application by the executive departments and agencies of government and their control by the legislature and the courts. The primary emphasis is on the frequently competing goals of effective government, administrative discretion and fairness to affected parties. A part of the course is designed to give students insights into the allocation of law and policy making among executive, legislative and judicial branches. Another part focuses on administrative procedure and the various constitutional, statutory and common law underpinnings of such procedures.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Clinical Intensive: Social Justice Lawyering Clinic
Course Number: 0782
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
After having completed the Social Justice Lawyering Clinic and Seminar, students will have the opportunity to engage in a more in-depth clinical experience. They will work on a project that addresses systemic issues in team-based collaboration with community-based organizations. In addition, each student will: (1) provide leadership for a team of students; (2) produce a written portfolio with at least three different forms of non-traditional legal writing; and (3) write a paper that critically examines their role working as a student lawyer within a social justice movement. Students are also expected to participate in a weekly team meeting with their faculty supervisor. There is no classroom component beyond what was taken in LAW 5034. Each semester, this course will focus on a particular social justice issue.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 781 (Social Justice Lawyering Clinic) and Law 5034 (Social Justice Lawyering Seminar)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Students interested in enrolling should rscipio@temple.edu
Course Title: Advanced Clinical Intensive: Temple Legal Aid Civil Practice for Clients with Health Care Issues
Course Number: 0775
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: Taken along with or after having completed Law 765, students have a more comprehensive clinical experience by doing an additional project or more in-depth client work to supplement the clinical work of Law 765. Projects are picked before the end of the first week of the semester. Projects can include any of the following: 1. Writing portfolio: Students draft several types of documents that are usual in law practices, which are likely to include different types of legal briefs and memos, a will, power of attorney, advance directive and other documents that are appropriate to client work. In appropriate cases , students will present these works to other students; 2. Legal intake/site development: Students staff intake at a site at which the office already has an intake arrangement or develop their own intake site with the instructor’s help. Students then work with clients there to determine their legal issues and advise or represent them. Students write a paper describing an aspect of their work, such as the value of different legal service delivery systems or an aspect of legal practice that they are encountering regularly; 3. Student developed projects: Students with particular interests can develop their own project with the instructor, if the instructor feels that it is likely to be productive. This could include students who have previously taken Law 765 expanding on representation in a certain type of case or students developing an expertise in a certain area of law related to the office’s work but not handled by the office. Note: This is a letter graded clinical. This clinical can be combined in one semester with Law 765 Temple Legal Aid Office: Civil Practice for Clients with Health Care Issues to allow for a total of 6 credit hours. Certification under Rules 321 and 322 of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is required. Time Requirements: 8-10 hours per week. Classroom Component: There is no classroom component beyond what is taken or was taken in Law 765.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Law 765 Temple Legal Aid Office: Civil Practice for Clients with Health Care Issues
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Advanced Contracts: UCC and Interpretation
Course Number: 0417
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course focuses on sophisticated commercial problems and cases, usually based on Article 2 (the Sales article) of the Uniform Commercial Code and occasionally on the Convention on the International Sales of Goods. A primary emphasis is on methods for interpreting contract provisions and the underlying statutory provisions, usually during the performance phase of contracts. The problems confronted in the course are somewhat broader than those arising in the Sales course. In addition, they often arise in transactional and counseling settings and the material lends itself to considering the role of lawyers in these situations, as distinguished from their roles as litigators. Both this and the Sales course are the easiest transition from the Contracts course in first year. Article 2 of the UCC is a subject covered by the bar exam.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Employment Discrimination
Course Number: 1037
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Employment discrimination law is an ever-changing field that is often the focus of Supreme Court attention and popular media. This seminar will focus on the primary employment discrimination statutes - Title VII, the Americans with Disabililties Act (ADA), and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) - the origins of these statutes, the protections they provide, and the intriguing issues that are currently being debated in the field. The course will begin by considering the various statutes, the role that regulations play in their interpretation, and the theories supporting anti-discrimination law generally. We will then examine a series of emerging questions that have received attention from the courts and practitioners in recent years. In addition, the course will ask several overarching questions including: (1) What is the role of discrimination law in our society? (2) What is the most effective way to combat inequality? and (3) What is the proper role of goverment and the courts in this process? Throughout the course, we will use case studies and practical exercises that help to elucidate these questions in the context of real-world examples.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Legal Writing: Effective Motion Practice in Civil Litigation
Course Number: 1015
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Utilizing one fact pattern, students will learn the purpose of - and how to effectively draft - significant motions as a case is prepared for trial. This writing seminar is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the primary pre-trial motions used during the course of civil litigation, including: 1) motions to dismiss/preliminary objections, 2) discovery motions, 3) motions in limine, and 4) Frye/Daubert motions challenging expert testimony. Both Pennsylvania Rules of Civil Procedure and local procedural rules governing motions practice will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the purpose behind the various motions as well as how to effectively draft those motions for use in civil litigation.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Trial Advocacy (Civil)
Course Number: 0569
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course provides an intensive examination of the theory and practice concerning the examination of witnesses and the boundaries of "Relevant Evidence" with the primary focus on selected topics of impeachment and rehabilitation. The course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the trial process system from the perspective of the courtroom lawyer, an ability to perform certain trial skills within the ambit of witness examination and an analysis of trial tactics and techniques as well as trial rules and procedures. Articles VI and IV of the Federal Rules of Evidence are studied in-depth and explored in their application to the courtroom experience.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 402 (Civil Procedure); Law 540 (Evidence); Law 558 (Introduction to Trial Advocacy) or Law 460 and 461 (Trial Advocacy I and II)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Trial Advocacy (Criminal)
Course Number: 0565
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the criminal trial process from initiation of charge through verdict. Intensive examination of case theory as it relates to all phases of the trial will be stressed. In addition to trying two complete jury trials, students will perform at preliminary hearings and motions to suppress. Special emphasis will be placed on the examination and cross examination of experts.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I); Law 532 (Criminal Procedure I)
Co-requisites:
Law 540 (Evidence); Law 558 (Introduction to Trial Advocacy) or Law 460 and 461(Trial Advocacy I and II)
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Trial Advocacy (Speech Making)
Course Number: 0669
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This performance based course will explore the art of speechmaking by focusing on the elements of what constitutes clear and persuasive speech in a legal context. It will consider the use of speechmaking in a variety of contexts that arise in legal practice (e.g., with individual clients and client boards, in negotiations and settlements, before judges, arbitrators, and mediators). Particular attention will be paid to the use of speeches in litigation. Principles of persuasion will be identified and analyzed in how they advance the three purposes of a speech: to entertain; to inform; and to persuade. Students will focus on preparing, organizing, drafting, using exhibits, quoting witnesses, explaining burdens of proof, incorporating judicial instructions, calling opponents on mistakes and misstatements, avoiding impermissible arguments and actual speech delivery.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 540 (Evidence) and Law 558 (Introduction to Trial Advocacy) or Law 460 and 461 (Trial Advocacy I and II).
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Trial Advocacy: Technology in Trial and Litigation
Course Number: 5032
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course will teach students to use technology to present their message persuasively; to organize and prepare cases; and to control the message both verbally and visually. It will introduce students to various current and emerging technologies used in courtrooms throughout the country. Students will also explore the world of the short attention span and develop advanced trial presentation skills. At the same time the course will keep students connected to the basic underpinnings of trial advocacy, including mastery of the rules of evidence, admission of exhibits, impeachment, and theory driven speeches.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 540 (Evidence) and Law 558 (Introduction to Trial Advocacy) or Law 460 and 461 (Trial Advocacy I and II).
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Advanced Trial and Litigation Strategy
Course Number: 0863
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar provides an intensive examination of the theory and practice concerning the examination of witnesses and the boundaries of "Relevant Evidence: with the primary focus on selected topics of impeachment and rehabilitation. The seminar is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the trial process system from the perspective of the courtroom lawyer, an ability to perform certain trial skills within the ambit of witness examination and an analysis of both trial tactics and techniques as well as trial rules and procedures. Articles VI and IV of the Federal Rules of Evidence are studied in-depth and explored in their application to the courtroom experience.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 540 (Evidence); Law 558 (Introduction to Trial Advocacy) or Law 460/461 (Trial Advocacy I and II)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial + Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Advising the Multinational Company on Global Legal Issues
Course Number: 0494
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This interactive and participatory course is intended to provide a survey of the types of issues confronting lawyers, and particularly in-house lawyers, who advise multinational corporations on a worldwide basis. The areas to be discussed include topics that will cross corporate law, tax law, labor and employment law, employee benefits, litigation and corporate compliance. Real life examples will be used to illustrate the complicated nature yet importance of this type of practice. Further, in addition to the more substantive legal topics to be covered, the course will also be interspersed with practice tips, jurisdictional practice highlights and ethical considerations for the multinational practitioner. The success of the course depends highly on each class member coming to class prepared, and more important, on each class member participating in our discussions. Because of this, class participation will account for 30% of the final grade. The remaining 70% of a student’s grade will be based on a final paper and presentation (weighted equally). Note: This course does not satisfy the graduation writing requirement.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Advocacy in Transactional Lawyering
Course Number: 0477
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course offers advocacy techniques for those who anticipate practice in a non-litigation setting. Students work with the basic principles of advocacy that apply in various situations likely to be encountered in transactional and hybrid practice settings. Elements include theory and psychology of persuasion; rhetoric and argument devices, and communication skills. The course offers some exposure to the basics of questioning techniques and short arguments on the premise that non-litigators will need to appear in administrative settings (hearings and group presentations). The negotiation process is analyzed, with emphasis on advocacy techniques that can be employed along the way. There are readings, lectures, learning-by doing exercises, and review of videotapes. Grading is based on an accumulation of performance results and written submissions. The lawyering situations to be addressed in this course include: advising the client, and persuading why a particular course of action is in the client's best interests; negotiation - planning and use of techniques in the stages of the process; supporting a work product - making the oral presentation of an assignment; building cooperation in work groups - using brainstorming and other leadership techniques; marketing - basic theory/psychology of "selling", using practice anecdotes to understand storytelling technique; essentials of advocacy at administrative hearings; crossover - common characteristics of effective written and oral advocacy.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 477 and the Integrated Trial Advocacy Program
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Alternative Dispute Resolution
Course Number: 0623
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
Discontent with the ability of American civil courts to handle many types of disputes in a just, speedy and economical way has led to considerable efforts across the nation to create alternatives. This subject, now commonly called "Alternative Dispute Resolution" ("ADR"), has generated many disputing mechanisms in the past decade. A huge literature now exists.This course covers the main alternatives: competitive negotiation; principled negotiation ("Getting to 'Yes'"); mediation; and arbitration. In addition, a segment of the course explores ways in which courts are using ADR and in which states are creating ADR units to mediate public-impact disputes. The pedagogy includes overview lectures, readings (an excellent textbook exists), role plays (all students participate once), videos, and several guest speakers.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 402 (Civil Procedure I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 623 and Law 655
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: American Red Cross: Southeastern Pennsylvania Disaster Relief
Course Number: 0742
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: This clinical is available only to evening students during priority registration. Day students may not submit requests via the priority registration system. Day students should communicate their interest to be waitlisted via clinical@temple.edu. Third and fourth year evening division students will learn about disaster law and spend the semester gaining real world experience at the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania. By engaging in this work, students will consider the preexisting social inequalities that exist in society and the resulting vulnerabilities that exist in the face of disasters. During the semester, students will participate in four components of this clinical course. In the classroom component, students will learn the major laws, policies and programs governing disaster response, recovery, compensation and preparedness. In the intake component, students will create a legal needs assessment form, respond to disasters, and interview disaster survivors (in partnership with a Red Cross House social worker) in order to identify the most common legal issues that disaster survivors face. The core legal needs will likely involve public benefits, landlord-tenant issues and estate planning. In the research component, students will research the law that surrounds these issues, develop training manuals for handling these cases, and create material explaining the law that is suitable for internal and public dissemination. In the practice component, students will provide direct legal services to disaster survivors and local residents that will address one of the core legal issues – estate planning. Students will create a Temple Law School/SEPA Red Cross Estate Planning Day of Service which will occur at the end of the semester. Course Prerequisites: No courses are required. Time Requirements: The goal of this course is to provide an opportunity for evening division students to learn about the major laws, policies and programs that govern disaster response and recovery by engaging in real work at the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania. The classroom component is front-loaded and will be held over the weekend (Saturday and Sunday) prior to the start of each fall and spring semester and select weekend days. For the practice component of this course, students will be required to complete 8 hours a week throughout the semester in the evening or on weekends. The SEPA Red Cross will change the work schedules of the Red Cross House social work staff to allow for flexibility in evening division student schedules.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Anatomy for Litigators
Course Number: 0999
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course explores the medical/legal issues related to personal injury claims. In addition to discussing human anatomy from a litigator’s perspective, the course will examine issues related to theories of liability and defense, expert testimony, diagnostic tests, medical records, and HIPAA.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 414 (Legal Research and Writing I and II)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Course Title: Animal Law
Course Number: 0661
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course will examine the moral, ethical and public policy considerations involved in balancing the interests of animals and humans. Topics include the treatment of animals as property, including animal custody in divorce; state anti-cruelty laws; the federal Animal Welfare Act; the use of animals in research; veterinary malpractice; tort liability for animal-inflicted injury; consumer fraud litigation against animal-related industries; and animal rights advocacy in the age of ecoterrorism legislation.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Antitrust
Course Number: 0504
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The relevant federal statutes which regulate the competitive process and their interpretation by the courts are considered. Classroom discussion also covers the policy rationale for such regulation and economic conditions are examined.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Appellate Advocacy
Course Number: 0479
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The purpose of this course is to provide guidance to students concerning how to handle an appeal in the federal and state courts on a practical level. Toward that end, the class will attend two or three sessions of oral arguments at the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, the Superior Court of Pennsylvania and/or the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania. We will meet with judges of those courts who will hopefully attend our classes and provide illumination as to what we have observed in court. Experienced appellate advocates will appear as guest lecturers to provide us with the benefit of their experience and to share their knowledge and skills with the class. The guest lecturers for Fall 2010 will be Judge Ted McKee, Judge Susan Gantman, Judge Renee Cohn Jubelerir, AUSA appeals chief Robert Zausmer and Federal PD appeals chief David McColgin. The instructor will provide the latest updates in appellate law and practice on a weekly basis. The class will use Judge Ruggiero Aldisert’s leading text in this field, “Winning on Appeal”, and there will be supplemental readings pertinent to this topic. There will be no written examination; however, the class will be provided with a transcript of a real trial and will be required to submit an appellate brief and thereafter to argue the case as if they were before an appellate court. Students will be judged on classroom participation, the written brief and those oral arguments.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 402 (Civil Procedure I); Law 414 (Legal Research & Writing I & II).
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 479 and Law 835.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Appellate Advocacy
Course Number: 0835
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar will provide an intensive study of the appellate process, brief writing, and oral argument. Topics will include theories of persuasion, argument development, and strategic considerations in brief writing and oral argument. Students will research, brief, and argue a case on appeal.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 479 and Law 835.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research + Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Asian Law
Course Number: 0989
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar will focus on both the comparative and international role of law in several Asian societies, including China, Japan, Taiwan and the Korean peninsula. We will compare the ways in which the different societies handle similar problems, and we will also consider the extent to which they are developing a kind of regional international law. Additionally, we will consider the degree to which convergence of cultures, economies and politics in East Asia is helping to promote convergence of law.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Either Res or Ser
Notes:
Course Title: Banking & Financial Regulation
Course Number: 0506
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The infrastructure of banking and financial regulation was born in Philadelphia more than 200 years ago amidst a heated debate about whether the United States should even have a nationalized system of banking instead of one governed and regulated by local state interests.  Since then, as our economy and money-moving institutions have grown much more complex, so has our system of regulating them.  But is that system working?  And if so, for whom?  How can the system be efficient, profitable, innovative, and also help serve consumers? Through a variety of methods, this class will provide students with the tools to understand a) how we arrived at our current system of banking and financial regulation and b) where banking, financial regulation, financial market innovation and consumer financial protection will intersect in the years to come.  The class places special emphasis on the 2008 Financial Crisis, Dodd-Frank, and its implementation. There are no prerequisites, except that you a) be generally interested in business law, corporations, administrative law, consumer protection, or commercial litigation and b) have an interest in developing a rich understanding of the increasingly complex interaction between state and federal regulations (designed to promote efficiency, growth and fairness), consumers of financial products and services, and our nation's complex web of money moving institutions (banks, credit card companies, investment banks, credit unions, insurance companies, brokerage houses, pay-day loan shops, etc.).
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Bankruptcy
Course Number: 0530
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Our basic Bankruptcy course is designed to give you a good grounding in the Bankruptcy Code and the associated law governing the enforcement of civil judgments. The course focuses on personal (or consumer) bankruptcy as well as business bankruptcy. It deals with the structure of the Bankruptcy Code, the costs and benefits the process represents to those who become involved with it either as debtors or as creditors, and the strategic choices individuals and corporations must make in deciding whether to engage with this system.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Business Basics
Course Number: 0439
Credit Hours: 1
Course Description
Description currently not available
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Classes will meet for the first 7 weeks of the semester
Course Title: Business Immigration Law
Course Number: 0654
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
There is little or no doubt that much of the US economy is (and always has been) powered by foreign workers. Although the demand for certain types of workers may vary, we as a nation will need foreign nationals to fill important gaps in our economy. This course will examine the different ways US employers can hire workers from outside of the United States, as well as the options for foreign employers investing in or trading with the United States. It will also cover some of the ways in which particularly well-qualified foreign citizens can enter the United States without a sponsoring employer. We will also review some of the obligations the hiring of non-citizen workers places on employers, and the unique legal considerations in recruiting, hiring, and promoting foreign nationals. This course will provide a brief introduction to some of these issues, providing students with the information necessary to spot them before they become problems.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Business Intellectual Property
Course Number: 0476
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This objective of this course is to address various intellectual property issues businesses may face when developing and selling products. Intellectual property is one of the most expensive capital outlays for many organizations today and this course will focus on business-to-business transactions and how IP issues affect different organizations.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 547 (Introduction to Intellectual Property)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Recommended: Law 552/940 (Patents - exam course/writing seminar)
Course Title: Business Law
Course Number: 0702
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: This clinical program offers students the unique opportunity to provide general legal representation to small and start-up business owners in Pennsylvania area through the Small Business Development Center, a department in Temple's School of Business and Management. Students are expected to deal with a full range of small business legal problems which may include choice of business entity and entity formation, contracts, corporations, leases, franchise agreements, regulatory matters, intellectual property and environmental compliance, among others. Students deal directly with clients. Students must be comfortable communicating by e-mail. Time is spent on legal research, drafting, client meetings, and classroom seminars on various issues of business law and practice. Every student must produce a written work-product for assigned clients to obtain credit. Time Requirements: Full day Fridays (10 am-1 pm and 2-5 pm) Students must also have time other than Friday available to meet with clients and work independently on client issues. Students are expected to work approximately 8-10 hours a week in addition to the classroom component. Over the course of the semester, this means that each student should log a total of 112-140 hours of practice or work time, not including the classroom component.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 508 Corporations, Law 600 Taxation
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Business Mergers and Acquisitions
Course Number: 0451
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The course will prepare students seeking employment as business lawyers by exploring fundamental legal issues arising in mergers and acquisitions. It will include a review of basic state code provisions relating to mergers and acquisitions using provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law ("DGCL"). The course will examine provisions of the DGCL authorizing mergers and acquisitions, evaluate instances when stockholder approval is required and assess issues arising in different deal structures and the various consequences of each, including tax issues relating to asset and stock deals and successor liability issues. Once students have a solid understanding of how deals are consummated under state law and the structural issues associated with various deal forms, the class will scrutinize certain drafting and negotiating issues arising in preliminary and final acquisition agreements and will analyze basic closing documents and study the role of business lawyers in acquisition transactions. The course also will cover fiduciary duties of board members relating to acquisitions including a board's power to thwart unwanted takeover attempts as well as a response to competing bidders.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 508 (Corporations)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Business Planning for International Transactions
Course Number: J651
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This course covers issues that arise when business organizations plan international structures. It will address such questions as selection of entity, financial and ownership structures, steps in the formation of different entities, the rights and duties of different stakeholders, tax issues related to the foregoing and related issues.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Chinese Law
Course Number: 1024
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This seminar provides students with an understanding of the Chinese legal system.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Either Res or Ser
Notes:
Course Title: Citizenship from a Constitutional Perspective
Course Number: 1019
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This seminar examines how political communities accept, reject, and expel individual members as citizens, and how citizenship law defines and reflects national identity. The course considers how American citizenship is acquired at birth, and what requirements are imposed on naturalizing aliens. It also considers in what circumstances the government can deprive an individual of citizenship; the special problems of dual nationality; historical racial and gender aspects of citizenship; the special context of terrorism; and the constitutional status of aliens and the extent to which they can be legally disadvantaged, as for instance with respect to welfare and other public benefits eligibility. The course also considers the meaning of territorial, Native American, and state citizenship, and uses comparative and international perspectives to inform the study of U.S. citizenship law. This seminar is not an immigration survey course, and will only tangentially address issues related to immigration law and practice, i.e., law relating to the admission of non‑citizens to the territory of the United States.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Course Title: Citizenship, Immigration and Refugee Law
Course Number: 0550
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The course provides a detailed overview of the laws which enable aliens to enter, reside in and ultimately become citizens of the United States. Among the topics discussed are: U.S. immigration policy and the limits of legislative and executive regulation of aliens, racial and geographic quotas, types of visas, arrest, detention, grounds of excludability of aliens and of waiver of excludability, political asylum and refugee admission, processing of relative and employer petitions, change of status within the U.S., administrative procedures and appeals, nationality by birth and by naturalization, revocation and expatriation.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: City Solicitor: Claims Litigation
Course Number: 0735
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: Students serve as lawyers in the Claims Division of the City Solicitor's Office and are assigned cases involving a variety of tort actions filed against the City. Students are exposed to all aspects of the litigation process, including the initial responsive pleading, written discovery, deposition, pre-trial motions, municipal court and arbitration hearings. All work is supervised by an attorney. Because of the nature and scheduling of cases during the semester, students may be required to attend litigation proceedings on a day other than Wednesday. Every effort is made to accommodate a student's schedule. Attendance throughout the semester at a Wednesday lecture series is required. Note: Certification under Rules 321 and 322 of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is required. Time Requirements: Full day Wednesdays. Students should also have a morning or afternoon other than Wednesday available to act as counsel in litigation proceedings. Students should expect to work 8-10 hours per week in addition to the one-hour classroom component. Over the course of the semester, this means that each student should log a total of 112-140 hours of practice or work time, not including the classroom component.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better), Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Civil Pre-Trial Practice
Course Number: 5035
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course takes students through the complete civil litigation pre-trial process. It begins with the investigation of a case pre-suit: What is permitted? What is not? What is cost effective? Pennsylvania actually provides pre-complaint discovery. Should we engage in such formal discovery? Why or why not? The next topic is pleading, followed by discovery (interrogatories, requests for production, requests for admission, and depositions), followed by motions for summary judgment, pre-trial memoranda, and pre-trial settlement conferences.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 517 (Civil Procedure II) and Law 540 (Evidence)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Civil Procedure I
Course Number: 0402
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Commencement of an action, pleading, pre-trial techniques of discovery, the trial, judgments and jurisdiction, res judicata, collateral estoppel, bar and merger and other collateral attacks are considered in a federal setting with appropriate emphasis on historical antecedents.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Mandatory
Notes:
Course Title: Civil Procedure I
Course Number: J402
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This course will primarily focus on federal courts and will include issues of jurisdiction, venue, forum non convenience and choice of applicable law (the "Erie doctrine"). Res judicata and collateral estoppel concepts with their preclusive effects as the result of prior litigation will also be introduced along with joinder and class actions.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Civil Procedure II
Course Number: 0517
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The litigation process from the pleading stage through appellate review is thoroughly studied. Areas covered in detail include: pleading, complex multi-party litigation (class actions, necessary parties, inter-pleader, intervention, multi-district litigation); discovery practice; pre-trial conference; trial and post-trial procedures; fundamentals of appellate review, securing and enforcing judgments; and problems of judicial administration.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 460 (Trial Advocacy I); Law 540 (Evidence - Integrated)
Co-requisites:
Co-requisite: Law 461 (Trial Advocacy II)
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Civil Procedure II
Course Number: 0974
Credit Hours:
Course Description
The litigation process from the pleading stage through trial is thoroughly studied in this writing seminar. Areas covered in detail include: pleading, preliminary injunctions, motion practice, multi-party litigation, class actions, discovery practice and post-trial motions.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 517 and Law 974
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Climate Change Law and Policy
Course Number: 1007
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Global climate change is threatening to cause severe, widespread and possibly catastrophic changes to our planet. This seminar will consider the implications of climate change for domestic and international law and policy. International negotiations are scheduled to take place in Copenhagen in December 2009, climate change legislation is pending in Congress, and the EPA is poised to begin regulation of greenhouse gases under existing law. How should such legislation be designed in order to accomplish the radical restructuring of the U.S. economy that will be necessary in order shift energy production away from our current heavy reliance on fossil fuels? Should it employ a carbon tax, a cap-and-trade system, or some other regulatory mechanism? How should the costs of transitioning to the new “green economy” be allocated? Should the poor receive subsidies to offset rising energy costs? How might an international agreement to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions be structured to be both politically feasible and fair? Should such an agreement impose costly emissions reduction obligations on developing nations that are already struggling economically, when the problem has been primarily caused by those in the developed world? Who should pay the costs of adapting to those adverse effects of climate change that have already become inevitable—effects that are likely to fall most heavily on the developing world? In the absence of a unified regulatory approach at either the federal (U.S.) or international level, how have advocates already begun to use existing legal structures to try to force action on climate change? We will address these and other questions in the seminar with the help of readings drawn primarily from books and scholarly articles. Students will write a series of short papers over the course of the semester based on the readings and will take an active role in facilitating class discussions.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Environmental Law is recommended but not required.
Course Title: Collective Bargaining
Course Number: 0431
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course examines collective bargaining: the duty to bargain in good faith and enter into and enforce collective bargaining agreements through the courts.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Commercial Arbitration Law and Procedure
Course Number: 5020
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course looks at the body of law, primarily federal law under the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA), governing the intersection between courts and the arbitral forum. It covers the issues presented to courts for resolution relating to compelling arbitration, arbitrators' exercise of court subpeona power, and court confirmation and vacatur of arbitration awards. The primary focus of the course will be the FAA and the body of case law governing application of its provisions.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Commercial Bankruptcy Practice and Procedures
Course Number: 0482
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
Bankruptcy is an important component of commercial and business law that blends transactional and litigation practice, and requires lawyers with strong drafting, negotiating, and oral advocacy skills. This course is a general introduction to bankruptcy practice and procedures with principal emphasis on commercial reorganizations and liquidations under Chapters 11 and 7 of the Bankruptcy Code. The course will consists of lectures and discussions of problems and contemporary case studies designed to examine the law and policy of commercial bankruptcy, the powers and authority of bankruptcy courts and various practical and ethical issues.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Commercial Litigation Strategy
Course Number: 0667
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The course includes case studies of categories of litigation and the types of relief that plaintiffs seek, including damages, injunctive relief, declaratory judgments, and class actions. Experienced litigators will be guest speakers. Students will be expected to read cases assigned and participate in class discussions. Generally, each class will have two separate segments. One segment will be discussion of the cases from the assigned reading, generally led by one of the students, subject to advance assignment. The discussion will focus on the contentions by counsel and the court’s decision, with an emphasis on strategic objectives and alternatives. The second segment will discuss a general litigation topic, usually with a guest speaker. There is no exam. The grade will be based on class participation (20%), one short paper (20%), and one long paper (60%)
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Commercial Transactions
Course Number: 5031
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Commercial transactions invoke 3 distinct systems: (1) sales systems, (2) financial systems, and (3) secured credit. This course introduces the legal rules and principles that undergird the first and third of these systems, i.e. sales and secured transactions. It is organized with reference to the systems in which commerce operates rather than the sections or categories into which statutes and legal doctrine divide. This approach shows the connections among different topics and the kind of issues that will be raised by the current and new institutions and systems that students will likely encounter during their careers.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for Law 5031 if they have taken either Law 622 (Sales) or Law 589 (Secured Transactions).
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Comparative Competition Law
Course Number: J115
Credit Hours:
Course Description
Description currently not available
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Comparative Constitutional Law
Course Number: 0509
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course will engage in a comparative study of selected constitutional problems, with particular emphasis on the constitutional law of the United States in comparison and contrast with the constitutional law of various other democratic nations, including the European Union and its constituent states, Australia, Canada, India, Israel, Japan, South Africa, and others. Topics will include issues of constitutional structure (e.g., judicial review, separation of powers, executive authority, federalism) as well as human rights in such contexts as abortion, criminal punishment, gender equality, sexual orientation, protection for linguistic and cultural minorities, freedom of expression, and freedom and establishment of religion.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Comparative Criminal Procedure
Course Number: J907
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This course will compare selected aspects of criminal procedure in common law systems and in civil law systems. It will also examine specific aspects of American and Japanese criminal procedure. Topics to be investigated are arrest, detention, bail, search warrants, arrest warrants, the right to counsel, jury trial, confessions and guilty pleas.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Comparative Family Law
Course Number: 1032
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course examines various countries' family laws in light of key comparative law debates, including the legacies of colonialism and the role of globalization; changing definitions of "family" and borrowing across legal systems; migration for marriage and adoption; the role of culture and religion in defining family law codes; and the influence of human rights law. The course will also address, to a lesser extent, the treatment of family law in international law and by multinational courts.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Comparative Immigration Law
Course Number: J550
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This course surveys the key areas of Japanese and U.S. immigration law, and provides students with a sound understanding of not only the law, but its application in practice in both Japan and the U.S. Cases and articles are used to illustrate the topics and issues that are relevant to both practicing lawyers and students of immigration law. The course will cover traditional areas such as political asylum and refugees, nonimmigrant and immigrant visas, as well as other issues in order to provide an insight into the practice of immigration law as performed in both Japan and the U.S.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Comparative Law
Course Number: 0898
Credit Hours:
Course Description
A study of the origins, structure and distinctive features of the two main legal traditions of Western Civilization - the Civil Law and Common Law traditions - and their influences on selected national legal systems around the globe.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 518 and Law 898
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Comparative Law
Course Number: 0518
Credit Hours:
Course Description
A study of the origins, structure and distinctive features of the two main legal traditions of Western Civilization - the Civil Law and Common Law traditions - and their influences on selected national legal systems around the globe.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 518 and Law 898.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Complex Civil Litigation
Course Number: 0883
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The areas to be covered in complex litigation include sophisticated areas of joinder, including interpleading and intervention, exhaustive treatment of class litigation, derivative suits, duplicative or related multi-forum litigation, discovery in a complex case, Civil RICO, multi-district litigation and other sophisticated means of judicial control of the litigation process.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 517 (Civil Procedure II)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Course Title: Conflict of Laws
Course Number: 0522
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course studies problems of jurisdiction and choice of law arising from our federalist system of government. The course emphasizes conflicts among state laws governing daily transactions as well as principles governing enforcement of state judgments. The course may also investigate issues implicating the Erie doctrine and federal common law.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 402 (Civil Procedure I); Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Constitutional Law
Course Number: 0404
Credit Hours: 4
Course Description
Judicial review of legislative and executive actions in a constitutional setting, the relationship of the states to the federal government (Federalism), the relationship of the people to government (Bill of Rights) and the powers of the Congress are considered.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not self register. Registration is performed by Student Affairs.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Mandatory
Notes:
Course Title: Constitutional Law and Foreign Policy
Course Number: 0612
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course explores the relationships of selected principles of constitutional law and adjudication with the conduct of U.S. foreign policy; especially from World War II to the present.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 612 and Law 872.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 612 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 872 to take th
Course Title: Constitutional Law and Foreign Policy
Course Number: 0872
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course explores the relationships of selected principles of constitutional law and adjudication with the conduct of U.S. foreign policy; especially from World War II to the present.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 612 and Law 872.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 612 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 872 to take th
Course Title: Consumer Bankruptcy Assistance Project
Course Number: 0753
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: Working in partnership with the Consumer Bankruptcy Assistance Project (CBAP), this clinic will provide students with the opportunity to learn, through direct representation of clients, Chapter 7 bankruptcy law and practice within the context of an impoverished client bases. Students will interview clients and provide debt counseling and budget review. In cases where debt counseling will not provide a client with the opportunity to stabilize their finances, the student, supervised by the clinical supervising attorney will represent the client in a pro bono Chapter 7 bankruptcy in order to discharge a client’s unsecured debts. Through CBAP’s Fresh Start Clinic, clients gain access to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court system and experience the powerful legal tool that bankruptcy offers. Students will become sensitized to the reality of living in poverty in Philadelphia. Clients come to CAP, as a last resort, after having tried to resolve their financial difficulty on their own. Most of the clients file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy as the result of an unanticipated catastrophic life event such as a funeral, injury on the job, loss of employment, interrupted spousal or child support, illness, or loss of a car that greatly restricts employment options. As with all clinical courses, students will participate in both a classroom and practice component. The classroom component will provide students with an understanding of the complicated procedural and substantive legal issues involved in counseling and representing clients seeking bankruptcy relief. The classroom component also will provide an ongoing forum for students to explore the economic, psychological, cultural and socio-economic ramifications of bankruptcy as well as the ethical implications of consumer bankruptcy practice. The practice component will emphasize all aspects of representing bankruptcy clients from intake to final disposition. Note: This clinical is a two-semester commitment. Only students who have Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better) and Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy (ITA) will be permitted to represent clients in court. Course Prerequisites: No courses are required. Time Requirements: The classroom component will take place on Wednesday mornings at 11 am at the offices of the Consumer Bankruptcy Assistance Project in Center City Philadelphia. Note that it is essential for students to be available for the entire day on the first Wednesday on which the clinical takes place for orientation - a crash course in what students will most need to know to start working immediately. Students should expect to work approximately 8-10 hours a week in addition to the classroom component. This will vary week to week depending upon the caseload. Over the course of each semester, this means that each student should log a total of 112-140 hours of practice or work time, not including the classroom component.
Pre-requisites:
See Clinical Programs web page
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Students must enroll in this clinical for the entire year. This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Consumer Law and Litigation
Course Number: 0524
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
Through lecture, class discussion and case problems, this course will examine federal and state statutes, regulations and judicial decisions governing consumer financial transactions. The primary focus will be on the litigation of disputes in this area. Significant attention will be paid to the emerging problem of theft of credit identity. The course will be permeated with actual consumer problems and contracts, with emphasis throughout upon case strategy and the impact of federal procedure on gaining advantage in litigation. Time will be devoted to trial issues that arise in a consumer case, especially with regard to voir dire and opening statements.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Recommended Courses: Sales and/or Secured Transactions; Evidence.
Course Title: Contracts
Course Number: 0406
Credit Hours: 4
Course Description
Topics may include: the bargain, fairness, equality of the bargain and formalisms such as parole evidence and Statute of Frauds are examined in the context of the common law and Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Further utilizing the Uniform Commercial Code, the common law and other statutory bases, impossibility, change, condition, anticipatory breach, good faith duty to act, judicial remedies, controlling risk and remedy, third party beneficiaries and assignment are examined.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Mandatory
Notes:
This course is mandatory as part of the first year curriculum for full time students.
Course Title: Contracts (LLM)
Course Number: G406
Credit Hours: 4
Course Description
Topics may include: the bargain, fairness, equality of the bargain and formalisms such as parole evidence and Statute of Frauds are examined in the context of the common law and Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Further utilizing the Uniform Commercial Code, the common law and other statutory bases, impossibility, change, condition, anticipatory breach, good faith duty to act, judicial remedies, controlling risk and remedy, third party beneficiaries and assignment are examined.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Open to International LLM students only. Shown here for informational purposes.
Course Title: Copyrights
Course Number: 0862
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The goal of this writing seminar is to introduce students to the basics of US copyright law. Without detracting from this goal of covering the (domestic) copyright basics, we will also look at these issues in the specific context of these new technologies and the growing internationalization of copyright law, in order to introduce you to some of the problems that are likely to arise as copyright law enters the next century. Topics to be covered include the subject matter of copyrights, copyright ownership, the scope of copyright protection, the nature of the copyright infringement inquiry, the “fair use” and other defenses, and selected issues concerning the international enforcement of copyrights.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 547 (Introduction to Intellectual Property)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 553 and Law 862.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 553 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 862 to take thi
Course Title: Copyrights
Course Number: 0553
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the basics of US copyright law. Without detracting from this goal of covering the (domestic) copyright basics, we will also look at these issues in the specific context of these new technologies and the growing internationalization of copyright law, in order to introduce you to some of the problems that are likely to arise as copyright law enters the next century. Topics to be covered include the subject matter of copyrights, copyright ownership, the scope of copyright protection, the nature of the copyright infringement inquiry, the “fair use” and other defenses, and selected issues concerning the international enforcement of copyrights.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 547 (Introduction to Intellectual Property)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 553 and Law 862.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 553 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 862 to take thi
Course Title: Corporate Reorganization: Chapter 11 Bankruptcy
Course Number: 0528
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
Problems related to the reorganization under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code of financially stressed corporations are considered.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Corporate Scandals and Crises
Course Number: 1029
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This seminar examines the legal and practical considerations surrounding selected corporate scandals and crises. Additionally, it aims to develop and foster substantive legal knowledge and practical legal skills among its participants.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 508 (Corporations)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Corporate Taxation
Course Number: 0511
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the taxation of corporations and their shareholders. It examines the concept of a corporation for tax purposes, corporate formations, debt versus equity, dividends and distributions, penalty taxes on undistributed income, redemptions and partial liquidations, Section 306 stock, liquidations, collapsibility, reorganizations, corporate divisions, affiliated corporations and corporate tax attributes.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 600 (Taxation)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Corporations
Course Number: 0508
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course is an introduction to the law and policy governing corporations. Corporations are legally created entities designed to facilitate accumulation of large amounts of capital (that is money and other things of value). They do so primarily by offering investors the opportunity of a financial return on their investment, without the requirement to undertake financial risk (above the amount invested) or responsibility for managing the enterprise. Thus, corporations permit passive investment and the separation of ownership and control. Most of the law governing corporations are designed to regulate the relationships between owners (equity investors) and managers and to provide rules to govern managers in the exercise of power over actions of the company.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 406 (Contracts)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 508 and Law J508 (Corporations).
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Corporations
Course Number: J508
Credit Hours:
Course Description
Comparison of forms of business organizations, promoting and organizing the business association, allocation of an accountability for management and control of the business organization, problems incident to corporate entity, proxies, and the derivative suit, the issues of shares, going concern and other asset distribution and organic changes are studied.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Corruption Law and Policy
Course Number: 0489
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course will examine the phenomenon of public corruption. We will use recent and current corruption prosecutions -- from federal officials and lobbyists in Washington to local public officials and employees in the region -- as the focal point for discussion of the nature of public corruption, its costs, and efforts to combat or curtail it. Much of our focus will be on enforcement tools, including both relevant federal criminal statutes and investigatory techniques. The reading materials for this course will be reported decisions, law review articles, newspaper reports, indictments, briefs, and other court records from relevant cases.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Crimes and Immigration
Course Number: 1012
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This writing seminar will focus on the growing intersections between criminal law and immigration law, with a primary focus on immigration consequences of criminal convictions. The course will begin with an introduction to deportation and removal, and the specific criminal grounds for removal. The remainder of the course will focus on related topics such as immigration detention, applicability of criminal procedural rights in immigration proceedings, right to counsel, retroactivity, terrorist bars, victims of crime, and potential relief from removal despite convictions. This course is intended for students with an interest in either criminal or immigration practice, or both.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Criminal Appellate Procedure
Course Number: 0815
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The major focus of this writing seminar is on the procedures and rights involved in the appeal of a criminal case. (Many of these procedures are similar to those in civil cases.) Attention is given to understanding the implication of appellate rules for the trial of a case. The role of the appellate courts, as well as of appellate attorneys, is also examined. That portion of the course dealing with prosecutor appeals affords an opportunity for an extensive examination of important aspects of double jeopardy. Some brief attention also may be given to various forms of """collateral attack"" litigation and post-verdict trial" court motions. In lieu of an examination, students taking this course as a writing seminar will research and write a series of papers. Study of the course materials and participation in classes is also part of the process.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 503 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 815 to take th
Course Title: Criminal Appellate Procedure
Course Number: 0503
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The major focus of this course is on the procedures and rights involved in the appeal of a criminal case. (Many of these procedures are similar to those in civil cases.) Attention is given to understanding the implication of appellate rules for the trial of a case. The role of the appellate courts, as well as of appellate attorneys, is also examined. That portion of the course dealing with prosecutor appeals affords an opportunity for an extensive examination of important aspects of double jeopardy. Some brief attention also may be given to various forms of """collateral attack"" litigation and post-verdict trial" court motions.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 503 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 815 to take th
Course Title: Criminal Defense Advocacy: Camden Public Defender
Course Number: 0714
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: After orientation, including a study of legal foundations and techniques for defense of persons charged with criminal offenses, students participate in the representation of defendants including the investigation, brief preparation and trial of motions. Students are assigned to individual trial teams. Where possible, efforts will be made to accommodate students with interests in particular areas of criminal defense work. The clinical course includes a weekly classroom component on Wednesday. Court participation is encouraged. Time Requirements: Classroom component of this clinic meets Wednesday afternoons. Students are expected to work approximately 8-10 hours a week in addition to the classroom component. Over the course of the semester, this means that each student should log a total of 112-140 hours of practice or work time, not including the classroom component. Because of the nature and scheduling of criminal cases, students will maximize their opportunities for court time if they are available for at least one or two of the following times: Friday afternoons as this is when most pre-trial suppression and other motions are heard as well as violation of probation hearings, Thursday mornings which is when bail motions are heard and Monday and Wednesday mornings which is set aside for plea negotiations and the entry of negotiated guilty pleas.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 532 Criminal Procedure I, Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better), Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Criminal Defense Advocacy: Defender Association of Philadelphia
Course Number: 0716
Credit Hours: 4
Course Description
Course Description: After an intensive orientation that includes the Philadelphia Court System as well as Pennsylvania criminal law, criminal procedure, and criminal trial practice, each student individually will represent clients at the Municipal Court level for motions, trials and/or preliminary hearings. Each of the days in court will be followed up by a classroom review of cases handled as well as discussion and informal mock trials of next week's cases. A full day each week is spent representing the client in court followed by class. A significant amount of additional time must be spent by the student each week in preparing the case for trial. Most students in the past have felt that the heavy workload was redeemed by the wealth of experience provided by the course.. Students are advised that attendance is mandatory for the first class session and a prerequisite for enrollment. Any student on the waiting list who would like to be considered for placement in the event of an opening, must attend this first class training session. Note: Certification under Rules 321 and 322 of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is required. Time Requirements: Classroom component meets full day Wednesdays for the first three weeks. Student will then be in court on Wednesdays with classroom follow up until at least 5 pm for the remaining weeks. Students should avoid classes prior to 6 pm on Wednesday. Students are expected to work between 10-12 hours each week or 140- 168 hours over the 14-week semester. Students must be available on Fridays or Mondays for a two-hour block for trial preparation and client interviewing. This is in addition to the regular Wednesday sessions.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 532 Criminal Procedure I, Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better), Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Criminal Law I
Course Number: 0410
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The elements of major crimes, their policy and historical underpinnings and the alternatives for designating and dealing with major antisocial behaviors are considered. Some introduction to criminal procedure is provided.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not self register. Registration is performed by Student Affairs.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Mandatory
Notes:
This course is mandatory as part of the first year curriculum for full time students.
Course Title: Criminal Law II
Course Number: 0502
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course examines several aspects of substantive criminal law not covered extensively in Criminal Law I. Some of these subjects involve the interplay of substantive criminal law with constitutional issues, with evidentiary issues, and with procedural concerns -- all of which can better be brought to bear in an advanced course. Possible topics includes: limitations on what conduct should be criminalized; proportionality and legality limits; group criminality (advanced concepts involving corporate liability and conspiracy); exculpatory defenses based on mental illness and more recently developed defenses; entrapment; and an extensive examination of selected crimes such as rape and the theft related offenses.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Criminal Procedure I
Course Number: 0532
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This is a basic criminal procedure course, dealing mainly with the various constitutional rules governing police conduct prior to the institution of formal court proceedings. The major focus is on the federal constitutional rights and restrictions imposed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments. Searches and seizures, police interrogation, identification procedures and the exclusion of evidence obtained in violation of these provisions account for a substantial portion of the course. Some additional matters are covered, including some aspects of the formal court-connected proceedings and the basic principles of habeas corpus.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Criminal Procedure II
Course Number: 0932
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Criminal Procedure II covers the main pretrial stages of criminal proceedings in felony cases, from pre-arrest to trial: prosecution decision whether to prosecute; bail and other forms of pretrial release; preliminary hearings; indicting and investigating grand jury proceedings; joinder and severance of defendants and offenses for trial; speedy trial, prompt commencement of proceedings, prompt trial statutes and rules; pretrial discovery; prosecution disclosure and preservation of exculpatory evidence; defense obligations not to conceal inculpatory evidence; and guilty pleas proceedings, including plea bargaining. The course deals with more "practical" procedure than Criminal Procedure I; the constitutional provisions and appellate decisions. The class is conducted predominately through role-play simulations, but also uses more traditional case analysis (mainly U.S. Supreme Court cases) and problem solving. In the simulations, students are assigned to conduct hearings, argue motions, etc., serving as judges, attorneys and witnesses. Some of the students not assigned to perform the simulation are assigned to write on the problem.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial + Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Criminal Prosecution: Bucks County District Attorney
Course Number: 0725
Credit Hours: 4
Course Description
Course Description: The Bucks County District Attorney Clinic gives Temple students an opportunity to participate, as prosecutors, in a wide range of criminal proceedings. Students conduct preliminary hearings involving a variety of crimes including drug cases, domestic violence, retail thefts and burglary before District Judges of Bucks County. During the first three weeks of the clinic, students attend class all day on Wednesday and spend an additional four hours observing court and reviewing materials. Beginning with the fourth week, students will attend class on specified Wednesdays from 4-5:30 pm in accord with a syllabus that will be distributed in class. The classroom and practice components of the clinic are designed to give students a working knowledge of criminal prosecution in Pennsylvania. Students learn to manage their own case load, and are challenged to develop non-trial skills, such as witness preparation, interviewing, counseling, statutory research, negotiation and networking with defense counsel. Students have opportunities to work with trial attorneys by helping research and write appellate briefs. Students also have the opportunity to observe court proceedings for criminal cases being conducted in the Court of Common Pleas. The clinic is structured to give students a broad perspective on the breadth and variety of criminal cases and the realities of criminal prosecution. Note: Certification under Rules 321 and 322 of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is required. Time Requirements: Each student is required to dedicate 10-12 hours per week in addition to the classroom component. Beginning with the fourth week of the semester, students will be assigned to one of 20 Judicial Districts in Bucks County for one full day or two four-hour periods over two days each week. In addition, students should expect to spend approximately four hours per week preparing for court and debriefing after court. Students must have their own transportation to participate in this clinical course and will be compensated for their mileage.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 532 Criminal Procedure I, Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better), Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Criminal Prosecution: Philadelphia District Attorney
Course Number: 0720
Credit Hours: 4
Course Description
Course Description: Participants, after an intensive training period, will appear in the Philadelphia Municipal Court to handle preliminary hearings in felony cases and pretrial motions and trials in misdemeanor cases. Student experiences will be closely supervised and critically analyzed. Mock presentations and evaluations will be conducted throughout the course. Successful participants need excellent interpersonal and communication skills, flexibility and an ability to maintain their composure under stress. Students will be interacting not only with members of the judiciary before whom they appear, but also with opposing counsel, witnesses and victims of crime, some of whom may be uncooperative. Classroom Segment: All students, regardless of which days they appear in court, must be available all day (9 am-5 pm) on the first and second Wednesday of the semester for two intensive training sessions. All students, regardless of the days they appear in court, are required to participate in a classroom component from 3-5 pm each Wednesday. Court Assignment: Each student will have an assigned court day. Students will spend half of the semester assigned to felony preliminary hearings in the Criminal Justice Center. During the other half of the semester, students will be assigned to trial courtrooms in the Criminal Justice Center. Students must be available on their court day between 8 am and approximately 5 pm. After each court appearance, students must complete extensive paperwork. This must be done before the student leaves the office and entails approximately two hours of very careful preparation. Students cannot miss the class meeting to finish this work. Day Preceding Court Assignment: Each student is required to be available from 3-6 pm on the afternoon preceding each day in court to review case files with their assigned supervising attorney, and to prepare police subpoenas. Students who select Thursday as their court day can meet with their supervisors after class on Wednesday. Students must be available for approximately five to six hours, after they pick up their files, to prepare their cases and interview witnesses by telephone (witnesses cannot be called after 10 pm). Students cannot schedule any classes after 3 pm on the day preceding their court day. No student is eligible to participate in the program unless he or she is fully available as set forth above. There will not be an opportunity during the first training session for students to return to campus to drop or add other classes. Students are advised to carefully review their schedules before electing this course. Students on the waiting list, who wish to be considered for placement in the event of an opening, must attend the first training session. Note: Certification under Rules 321 and 322 of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is required. This is a very time intensive clinic. Pay particular attention to the time requirements. Students will be required to submit to a criminal record check. Time Requirements: During the first half of the semester, students will be litigating felony preliminary hearings. These hearings are held at the Criminal Justice Center, 1301 Filbert Street in Philadelphia. Regardless of their trial day, all students must be available during the following times. 1. All day Wednesday for the first two weeks for training sessions. 2. Wednesdays from 3-5 pm after the first two weeks for the classroom portion of the clinical. 3. A full day for court (8 am-7 pm) 4. The afternoon preceding the court day from 3-6 pm, in the DA's office, to discuss cases and prepare subpoenas. 5. The evening preceding the court day, either in the DA's office or at home, to prepare cases and telephone witnesses. Students may not schedule any late afternoon or evening classes on the day prior before the court day for preliminary hearings and two days before the court days for misdemeanor trials.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 532 Criminal Procedure I, Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better), Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Criminal Tax Litigation and Procedure (White Collar Crime)
Course Number: G503
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
An in-depth review of the criminal aspects of the federal tax laws from 1920 to the present including The Bank Secrecy Act of 1986, Title III of the USA PATRIOT ACT (also known as the International Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Act of 2001 and selected provisions of the Sarbanes- Oxley Corporate Fraud and Accountability Act of 2002). The course will also explore an analyze: the various methods of proof used by the IRS in investigating and prosecuting criminal tax fraud cases; investigative techniques; the right to cooperate in the investigation or to refuse to do so; the protections of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments; grand jury investigations; the right to a conference; motions before indictment; preparation for trial from prosecutorial and defense perspective; the trial; parallel proceedings; and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 600 (Taxation)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This is a Graduate Tax Program course. JD students must obtain permission to register from Assistant Dean Thompson or Professor Mandelbaum.
Course Title: Current Issues in Civil Rights Law
Course Number: 0998
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar covers the federal regime for protection of civil rights, with a particular focus on (1) emerging or unresolved issues in civil rights law and (2) the broader historical and sociological background underlying federal civil rights statutes and doctrines. Reading assignments (subject to change) will cover Critical Race Theory; the debate over affirmative action; Titles VI and IX (prohibiting discrimination based on race/ethnic origin and gender in programs receiving federal funds, respectively); sexual orientation; and racial profiling.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Current Issues in Family Law
Course Number: 0822
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This seminar will be a small but ambitious step toward initiating a transactional' family law program. The course will combine several basic substantive family law issues with several basic professional responsibility issues with several basic skill-based exercises. There will be two or three basic """problems"". Each problem requires integrating" substantive law with the rules of professional responsibility. Each problem requires exercising other basic lawyering skills, for example, client interviewing, intake processing, opponent attorney contact, negotiation, and client relations. The skill-based exercises for example, letters to clients, formalized agreements. As the course is currently planned, there may be a final' paper requesting students to tie the other experiences together. As currently imagined, the course is very hands-on', relying on simulations to stimulate discussions and development.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Current Issues in Japanese Law
Course Number: J105
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This seminar is available only to students with a sufficient level of Japanese language ability to enable them to participate in classes conducted in Japanese and to read primary source material in Japanese. Students are not required to write Kanji, but will have to read complex Japanese texts. A sufficient measure of language proficiency required is the ability to read Japanese newspaper articles, with or without using a dictionary. The course covers a variety of subjects including recent legal reforms in Japan. This course is taught in Japanese and is open only to non-native Japanese speaking students.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Current Problems in Law and Medicine
Course Number: 0969
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The goal of this course is to provide students interested in health law with a unique opportunity to conduct research on current problems being faced in the field of health law. The student will gain practical experience through exposure to health care law practitioners working on problems confronting Temple University Hospital. Using this experience to select a topic and generate ideas, the student will then conduct guided research and write a paper under the supervision of the course instructors.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Custody Law
Course Number: 1035
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This seminar covers the entire field of custody, including the following: History of custody in America; Constitutional implications; Definitions and general principles including joint custody; Psychological issues from the parent's point of view, from the children's point of view and from the lawyer's point of view; Child custody evaluations; Best interest standard and the factors affecting that standard; Paternity related presumptions and rights of third parties, including the state, grandparents, stepparents and relevance of in loco parentis and different burdens of proof; abuse; Interstate and International Child Custody Disputes; Relocation; Termination of parental rights; Dependency; Adoption; Methods of resolving custody disputes, including negotiation, mediation and litigation; Post-decision proceedings including modification of orders and appeal and contempt; and Special topics including surrogacy, biological or psychological parents and biotechnology issues.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 445 and Law 1035.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 445 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 1035 to take this course as a writing seminar.
Course Title: Custody Law
Course Number: 0445
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course covers the entire field of custody, including the following: History of custody in America; Constitutional implications; Definitions and general principles including joint custody; Psychological issues from the parent's point of view, from the children's point of view and from the lawyer's point of view; Child custody evaluations; Best interest standard and the factors affecting that standard; Paternity related presumptions and rights of third parties, including the state, grandparents, stepparents and relevance of in loco parentis and different burdens of proof; abuse; Interstate and International Child Custody Disputes; Relocation; Termination of parental rights; Dependency; Adoption; Methods of resolving custody disputes, including negotiation, mediation and litigation; Post-decision proceedings including modification of orders and appeal and contempt; and Special topics including surrogacy, biological or psychological parents and biotechnology issues.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 445 and Law 1035.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 445 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 1035 to take this course as a writing seminar.
Course Title: Cyberlaw and Policy: Practical Applications in Organizational Settings
Course Number: 0652
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course is a practical and concrete course applying Cyberlaw to pseudo-clients in legal practice. Legal and policy principles are studied that should be included in an acceptable use of electronic communications and technology policy. Included are the legal aspects of Internet, computer and information technology such as cyberprivacy, cybersecurity, commercial disparagement and defamation, cybercrimes, computer forensics, e-business, electronic issues. Students will be expected to prepare an acceptable use policy that is usable for a private corporation or public entity.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Cyberprivacy Law
Course Number: 0478
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
Information law deals with the flow of information - when do you restrict information and when do you let it flow? During this course students will examine information privacy legal principles related to electronic surveillance, the media, anonymity, databases and information, genetic testing and neuroimaging, terrorism and national security, public and private sector information, and home, school and work.Students will be expected to prepare for each class by reading the required legal readings and by accessing Internet web sites for current policy information. During class, students will discuss their prepared material and become involved in resolving problems that apply the out-of-class preparation. Additionally, students will make an in-class presentation on one topic. In-class work will contribute information to enhance the students’ legal understandings.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Cyberspace
Course Number: 0433
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The goal of this course is to introduce students, by means of a series of specific case studies chosen to illustrate the clash between existing legal regimes and new technologies, to a reasonably comprehensive subset of the legal problems that are being addressed as part of the developing "online law." Topics to be covered include the law of copyright as applied to electronic information, trademark law as applied to Internet "domain names," application of the First Amendment to the regulation of Internet communications, privacy concerns on the Internet, the law of anonymous communication and the regulation of encryption technology, and the difficult international jurisdictional questions presented by Internet activity. Although it is not a prerequisite, it is strongly recommended that students have had a course on intellectual property prior to enrolling in this course.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 433 and Law 848.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Cyberspace
Course Number: 0848
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The goal of this course is to introduce students, by means of a series of specific case studies chosen to illustrate the clash between existing legal regimes and new technologies, to a reasonably comprehensive subset of the legal problems that are being addressed as part of the developing "online law." Topics to be covered include the law of copyright as applied to electronic information, trademark law as applied to Internet "domain names," application of the First Amendment to the regulation of Internet communications, privacy concerns on the Internet, the law of anonymous communication and the regulation of encryption technology, and the difficult international jurisdictional questions presented by Internet activity. Although it is not a prerequisite, it is strongly recommended that students have had a course on intellectual property prior to enrolling in this course.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 433 and Law 848.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Either Res or Ser
Notes:
Recommended: Law 547 (Introduction to Intellectual Property)
Course Title: Death Penalty
Course Number: 0975
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar will explore the law administering the death penalty in the United States. Four papers [one a month] of 7-10 pages will explore students' personal reactions to legalization of the death penalty, issues of racism, over inclusion, resources, effective assistance, retardation, youthful offenders and post conviction limitations on seeking relief.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I); Law 532 (Criminal Procedure I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Course Title: Death Penalty Litigation
Course Number: 0701
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
See Clinicals under Academics on the Law School web site for course description.
Pre-requisites:
See Clinical Programs web page
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from Priority Registration.
Course Title: Developing Children’s Rights
Course Number: 1008
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The seminar will cover the following topics: 1) Childhood as a Legal Status . This segment of the course, joined with the next, act as foundation for identifying the basic legal problem in developing the constitutional rights of children; 2) Children as Family Members. This is focused on fleshing out the legal relationship between parents and children; 3) Children as Victims and Witnesses. This segment of investigates one of the dominant tensions in our system: children victimized by the very people assigned to protect them; 4) Children as Students and Agents. Here again, children are assigned to ‘protective’ environments that are sometimes hostile or unsupportive; 5) Children as Patients, Consumers, Litigants. This is a catch all, following from the highlighted ‘agency’ element of the school focused material; 6) Children as Offenders. This segment will be structured to consider the ways in which we hold children responsible for their choices even as otherwise characterizing them as incompetent deciders; and 7) Children as Citizens. This is designed to contain material on regulations directed at children like curfews, underage drinking, and gambling prohibitions.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 414 (Legal Research and Writing I and II)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Either Res or Ser
Notes:
Course Title: Domestic Relations Mediation
Course Number: 0738
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: This clinical course offers students an opportunity to be trained in mediation skills and to obtain experience conducting mediation sessions with actual disputants referred by the Family Court. Students will assist disputants to explore and develop their own options to resolve disputes rather than resort to litigation. Duties include explaining the goals and rules of mediation, interviewing the clients in the context of the mediation sessions and drafting the memorandum of agreement for the disputants at the conclusion of the mediation session as may be needed. The focus of the clinical course will be to introduce students to an alternative method of resolving disputes as applied in the domestic relations context. Time Requirements: Classroom Component: Intensive mediation skills training will take place on Wednesdays from 9 am-4 pm for the first three weeks of the semester. Thereafter, the students will participate in a debriefing session and are required to answer and turn in Mediator Reflection Questions after each mediation is completed. In addition to presentations designed to introduce students to a wide range of issues confronting the mediator, debriefing and feedback on the use of mediation skills in the actual sessions will be discussed. Clinic Component: Beginning the fourth week, after completion of the skills training, and continuing throughout the semester, interns will conduct actual mediation sessions with family court clients. There will also be opportunities to observe court proceedings such as judicial hearings and Master’s hearings. The mediation sessions are scheduled on Wednesdays.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 623 Alternative Dispute Resolution or Law 655 Mediation Advocacy and Practice or Law 568 Family Law or Law 445 Family Law: Custody or Law 455 Family Law: Economics of Divorce or Law 995 Family Law Theory, Policy & Practice
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Domestic Violence
Course Number: 0754
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
See Clinicals under Academics on the Law School web site for course description.
Pre-requisites:
See Clinical Programs web page
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Domestic Violence: Philadelphia Family Court
Course Number: 0755
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
See Clinicals under Academics on the Law School web site for course description.
Pre-requisites:
See Clinical Programs web page
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Drafting and Analyzing Fundamental Estate Planning Documents
Course Number: G805
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Students will learn to draft fundamental estate planning documents (wills, trusts, financial and health care powers of attorney and beneficiary designation forms) against the background of state property law, financial institution contracts and the state (and, sometimes, federal) laws concerning testamentary and non-probate distributions. The course will not focus on federal or state tax issues, although they may occassionally be discussed. Instead, the course will focus on the critical non-tax issues on document drafting.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 602 (Trusts & Estates)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This is a Graduate Tax Program course. JD students must obtain permission to register from Assistant Dean Thompson or Professor Mandelbaum.
Course Title: Drafting and Negotiating Real Estate Documents
Course Number: 0662
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course, taught by an experienced practitioner, will study the skills necessary to effectively negotiate real estate transactions and to draft the related documents. Working in small groups, students will have the opportunity to develop those skills by negotiating a commercial real estate lease and by drafting the key elements of the lease and the ancillary documents.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Drug and Medical Device Law
Course Number: 5029
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course provides an overview of the laws and regulations governing drugs and medical devices. Emphasis is placed upon the various regulatory pathways through which drugs and medical devices enter the U.S. market and the enforcement tools available to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and U.S. Department of Justice in regulating the health care products industries. Pertinent state laws, federal, state, and industry guidance documents, and relevant intellectual property laws are also considered.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not have previously taken Law 546 (Food and Drug Law)
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Drug Products Liability
Course Number: 0485
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
As pharmaceutical companies increasingly market prescription drugs directly to consumers via television and other media, and media accounts of gene therapy and life threatening problems with supposedly wonder drugs and medical devices such as Fen-Phen, Resulin, Stadol, and implants, etc., proliferate, it is essential to understand the interrelationship between drug products liability, professional malpractice, and hospital negligence. This course will explore the evolution of therapeutic drugs and devices from the manufacturer’s submission of the Application to the FDA through the approval of the Application to the marketing and prescription. The course will then explore the role of the FDA, pharmacists, physicians, and hospitals in the delivery of therapeutic drugs and devices to the consumer, and their respective obligations to the consumer. In that regard, this course will examine the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act, as well as many other complex legal and ethical theories applicable to drug and medical devices manufacturers, pharmacists, physicians, and hospitals in their therapeutic drug and devices interactions with the consumer. Currently publicized incidents such as problems with the Jesse Gelsinger gene therapy at the University of Pennsylvania, and others will be dissected within the context of both products liability and professional malpractice law.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 420 (Torts).
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 485 and Law 842 (Drug Products Liability).
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: East/West Negotiation
Course Number: J104
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This pass/fail course is intended to introduce students to the practical legal and cultural issues encountered when drafting and negotiating international agreements in the Asian context. A particular emphasis will be placed on negotiations involving American and Japanese parties through the examination of actual international commercial transactions. Students will have an opportunity to participate in the preparation of mock agreements and negotiations.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: E-Discovery
Course Number: 0666
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
With computers and e-mail dominating business and personal life, the nature of civil discovery has changed. Lawyers need to know how to request, identify, preserve, collect, process, review and produce digital information, in all its myriad of forms (from e-mail and Excel to social media and the "Cloud"). While this does not require a technical degree, there are significant pitfalls that lawyers can learn to avoid and better represent their clients. This class is designed to teach law students about the nuances of the quickly evolving world of e-discovery and provide practical help so that students can be immediately valuable to their employers and clients.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Education Law
Course Number: 0804
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course surveys a range of legal issues affecting children in our nation’s elementary and secondary schools, with considerable emphasis on policy and on problems of equal educational opportunity. Topics include the differing legal frameworks applicable to public, private and religious schools; the right, if there is one, to a quality education; issues of racial and class disparity; the education of students with disabilities, English language learners, and others with special needs; freedom of expression in schools; school discipline; and school finance equity.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 414 (Legal Research and Writing I and II).
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 534 and Law 804 (Education Law).
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Elderly Law Project
Course Number: 0730
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: This clinic offers students the opportunity to study a variety of statutes which particularly affect senior citizens and to represent clients of the Elderly Law Project. Students may represent clients before an administrative agency in matters involving the application of the Social Security Act and regulations which control social security, supplemental security income (SSI), social security disability, Medicare and Medicaid. Students also prepare legal documents such as wills, living wills and durable powers of attorney. They will advise clients about consumer problems, landlord/tenant matters, financial planning, long-term care, protective services and guardianship. Preparation for each case begins with the "initial intake" and ends with representation which may take the form of a hearing, informal negotiation or the preparation of a legal document. Students also prepare legal documents such as wills, living wills, and durable powers of attorney. They will advise clients about consumer problems, landlord/tenant matters, financial planning, long-term care, protective services and guardianship. Time Requirements: Full day Wednesdays. Students are expected to work 8-10 hours a week in addition to the classroom component. Over the course of the semester, this means that each student should log a total of 112-140 hours of practice or work time, not including the classroom component.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 5028 Law and Aging (formerly Law 591 Social Legislation: Law and the Elderly)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Election Law
Course Number: 0498
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
Elections in the United States are largely governed by state law and, in a few instances, local law. However, there is a body of federal law, deriving from the Constitution and a number of federal statutes, that establishes rule rules for the conduct of elections. It is not possible, nor is it likely to be helpful, to review the vast array of state and local laws that govern most of the American electoral system. This course is therefore largely devoted to the federal law aspects that create the sometimes dense, sometimes porous framework for the conduct of American elections. Special attention is given to the constitutional aspects of federal election law as defined by the Supreme Court and, occasionally, by lower courts; but in several sections of the course there is attention to federal statutes and regulations. At a conceptual level, the course also inquires about the nature of representation and what inferences for election law might be drawn from different concepts of representation.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Emerging Trends in Labor Law
Course Number: 1014
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
CANCELLED
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
CANCELLED
Notes:
Course Title: Employment Discrimination
Course Number: 0537
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The course covers race, sex, age and handicap discrimination in employment. The historical antecedents to modern discriminatory practices and early 19th and 20th century legislative and judicial efforts to curb discriminatory practices are studied, as well as the various federal statutes and Executive Orders establishing non-discrimination and affirmative action obligations and the source of congressional and executive authority to prescribe these rules. Also covered are the non-discrimination obligations imposed by and the affirmative action activity permitted by the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution and other relevant constitutional issues, including those arising under the Tenth and Eleventh Amendments.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Employment Law
Course Number: 0625
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course explores, in a manner suitable for non-specialists, issues of employer-employee relations in nonunionized settings. It supplements existing courses by examining problems such as: wrongful discharge and employment-at-will at common law; fair labor standards including minimum wages and maximum hours; comparable worth and equal pay; industrial accidents and occupational safety and health; income security, unemployment compensation and pension protection; employment discrimination; employees' rights in areas such as drug testing, lie detectors, privacy, whistle blowing; plant closings, job retraining, status of aliens and employer-employee cooperation.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Entertainment Law
Course Number: 0535
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course deals with selected legal issues which affect persons active in various aspects of the entertainment industry. These include pertinent contract, copyright, business association, securities regulation, communications and tax law issues. Special emphasis is given to the theater and to the recording and television industries.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Environmental Law
Course Number: 0536
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Private law remedies, administrative and legislative regulatory schemes to control use and abuse of environmental resources are examined. Principal emphasis is placed on air and water allocation in a federal setting and national environmental policy is reviewed.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Environmental Law-Delaware Riverkeeper Network
Course Number: 0715
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: The River Rapids Law Clinic is designed to expose students to the broad intersection of litigation, transactional work, policy, advocacy and work with grass-roots organizations. It provides a specialized and unique course of study focused on the local region’s natural heritage, practical legal skills and special issues and pitfalls in environmental law. Students in this clinical course will work closely with the Delaware Riverkeeper as well as the senior and staff attorneys of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network to provide legal support to environmental professionals and citizens to help effectively protect our environment and communities through compliance with the federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations. Under the supervision and guidance of the senior and staff attorneys, students will be expected to act as junior staff attorneys -- perform legal research; draft strategy memoranda, pleadings, briefs and other legal documents for timely filing with courts and other government agencies; and write and present comments and testimony before bodies considering proposals that will affect the environment. Time Requirements: This clinical course is based at the Delaware Riverkeeper Network, located at 925 Canal Street in Bristol, Pennsylvania. The classroom component is scheduled for Friday mornings and is held at DRN’s offices. Students are expected to work 8-10 hours in addition to the classroom component. Over the course of the semester, this means that each student should log a total of 112- 140 hours of practice or work time, not including the classroom component. Although some research work may be permitted to be done elsewhere, students should expect to be on site Friday mornings for seminar and Friday afternoons for part of the work hour commitment. Delaware Riverkeeper Network is located directly across from the Bristol train station (SEPTA R7) and has ample parking. Whether you drive or take the train, please consult a map to ensure that your timing and transportation needs can be met.
Pre-requisites:
See Clinical Programs web page
Co-requisites:
Co-requisite: Law 536 Environmental Law or Law 684 Natural Resources
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Environmental Litigation: Contamination and Superfund
Course Number: 0450
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
Using the federal Superfund program, this course explores the framing and resolution of disputes through administrative agency decision making, enforcement of actions by the government against private parties, lawsuits among private parties, contracts, and settlements. Students will develop a firm grounding in the details of the law of environmentally contaminated sites, as well as federal administrative procedure, litigation of claims and defenses, effects of releases and settlements, transactional due diligence, and allocation among jointly responsible parties.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: ERISA Fiduciary Provisions
Course Number: G802
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course will focus on the fiduciary and investment management considerations for employee benefit plans under ERISA, primarily on Title I, Part 4 of ERISA. Specific topics will include the determination of "fiduciary" status; the duties of company executives that act as fiduciaries; the investment of plan assets and the impact of the fiduciary rules on third party asset managers; and prohibited transactions under ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code. Reading materials will include statutes, regulations, cases, and Department of Labor rulings and other guidance.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 600 (Taxation)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This is a Graduate Tax Program course. JD students must obtain permission to register from Assistant Dean Thompson or Professor Mandelbaum.
Course Title: Estate and Gift Taxation
Course Number: 0544
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The federal estate and gift tax principles which apply to inter vivos and testamentary transfers of property are examined in this course. Tax consequences of various dispositive devices will be considered together with the marital deduction, the charitable deduction and valuation problems. The generation-skipping tax will be introduced.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 600 (Taxation)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Estate Planning I
Course Number: G803
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar addresses issues of accumulation, conservation and distribution of wealth will be addressed in this course. It examines the applicability of various pre and postmortem estate planning tools and techniques including wills, trusts, life insurance and inter-vivos transfers, together with the tax consequences which arise from their use. The generation skipping tax and the valuation problems encountered in planning and administering an estate are studied.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 600 (Taxation)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law G513 and Law G803.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This is a Graduate Tax Program course. JD students must obtain permission to register from Assistant Dean Thompson or Professor Mandelbaum. This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of stud
Course Title: Estate Planning I
Course Number: G513
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course addresses issues of accumulation, conservation and distribution of wealth will be addressed in this course. It examines the applicability of various pre and postmortem estate planning tools and techniques including wills, trusts, life insurance and inter-vivos transfers, together with the tax consequences which arise from their use. The generation skipping tax and the valuation problems encountered in planning and administering an estate are studied.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 600 (Taxation)
Co-requisites:
Co-Requisite: Law 544 Estate and Gift Taxation
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law G513 and Law G803.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This is a Graduate Tax Program course. JD students must obtain permission to register from Assistant Dean Thompson or Professor Mandelbaum. This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of stud
Course Title: Estate Planning II
Course Number: G515
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course examines the advanced planning techniques for charitable giving, the generation-skipping tax, qualified and non-qualified employee benefits, private business buy outs and similar transactions, grantor retained trust interests, use of a business as an estate planning tool, life insurance, elderly and disabled persons and divorce and non-traditional relationships. In addition, the drafting of irrevocable trusts (including Crummey powers), shareholder agreements, partnership agreements and valuation techniques, are covered.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 600 (Taxation); Law 544 Estate and Gift Taxation
Co-requisites:
Co-Requisite: Graduate Law G513 Estate Planning I
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
This is a Graduate Tax Program course. JD students must obtain permission to register from Assistant Dean Thompson or Professor Mandelbaum.
Course Title: Ethical Dilemmas and Standards for Public Servants
Course Number: 5022
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course will delve into what is ethical behavior for government officials and politicians. It will analyze the definition of ethics, what constitutes ethical behavior, and will examine moral theories in relationship to real life cases. It will also focus on examing how and where ethics fit into the roles of government officials and politicians. This course does not fulfill the requirement to take Professional Responsibility.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Ethical Perspectives on the Practice of Law
Course Number: 0961
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course challenges the view that a lawyer is merely an instrument for achieving his or her client's ends and then examines the relationship between professional roles and ordinary morality. We ask whether the lawyer must take personal moral responsibility for (a) the quality of his or her relationship with the client, (b) the outcome of the cases s/he handles, and (c) the tactics and the strategies used to achieve the outcome. This is a serial paper writing seminar. Also, this course is not a substitute for Professional Responsibility and may be taken before or after that required course.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Ethics in Practice
Course Number: 0751
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: This clinical is not available to students through priority registration. Interested students should contact Jen Bretscneider (215-204-2380; jennifer.bretschneider@temple.edu) regarding a seat in this clinical. This clinic provides students with opportunities to study ethical issues and problems of professionalism in the context of actual practice. Each student participates in an external placement, chosen by the student, with the instructor’s approval. The classroom component will focus on issues of professionalism and ethics. Informed by their own clinical practice, students learn about attorney obligations to the client, court, profession, and society, as well as develop an understanding of their own professional values and philosophy as practicing lawyers. Students participate in both a practice and classroom component. The practice component emphasizes exposure to an area of legal practice, the development of essential lawyering skills, and an enhanced understanding of the professional challenges unique to that particular practice and applicable to all lawyers. Students can come with their own placement or work with the instructor to create a placement that is compatible with the course objectives and the student’s individual interests. Each student must identify a mentoring attorney at his or her placement who is willing to monitor student assignments, offer critique, encourage immediate reflection and who is fully committed to the objectives of the course. In addition to examining global issues of ethics and professionalism, the classroom component utilizes the students’ experience to identify and explore issues particular to their areas of practice. A maximum of six students can take this course to satisfy their serial writing requirement. Finally, students who are not taking the course to satisfy the serial writing requirement will be required to keep journals reflecting on their experiences at their placements. This course is not a substitute for Professional Responsibility and may be taken before or after that required course. In accord with ABA and Law School policy, students are not permitted to receive compensation for work for which they receive academic credit. Course Prerequisites: Completion of the first year curriculum. No additional courses are required. Permission of the instructor. Time Requirements: Wednesdays most but not all weeks at a time to be determined. Most classes will be scheduled for two hours. Students are expected to spend 8-10 hours per week at their placements.
Pre-requisites:
See Clinical Programs web page
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Satisfies serial writing requirement. This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Evidence
Course Number: 0540
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
An examination of the rules governing the use of evidence, including problems of relevancy, hearsay, impeachment, burden of proof, presumptions and the function of judge and jury.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Co-requisite: Law 460 (Trial Advocacy I)
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Evidence
Course Number: J540
Credit Hours:
Course Description
An examination of the rules governing the use of evidence, including problems of relevancy, hearsay, impeachment, burden of proof, presumptions and the function of judge and jury.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Families in Law and Public Policy
Course Number: 1033
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar is designed to provide the opportunity to learn to be an effective advocate to improve public policy on behalf of children and families. Students will engage in interdisciplinary research regarding legal issues directly affecting children and families in areas such as divorce and separation, child custody and support, adoption and child welfare. The course will look at theories for how law and policy may undermine or support families and the many different approaches to reform. It will consider issues related to socio-economic status, race, religion and ethnicity in the law’s relationship to families. It will also consider practices of lawyers and courts in relationship to families and children. We will focus on gaining the skills to (1) identify areas that need reform; (2) conduct research related to full understanding of the problem requiring reform; (3) analyze the relevant research to propose solutions to the problem with particular emphasis on the form of the solution, such as statutory change or reform of court processes; and (4) effectively represent clients, including communication with clients, non-profit organizations, legislatures and courts. The course will require both oral and written communication individually and in groups. Evaluation will be based on the research paper, class participation, and performance on other oral and written communication exercises. Up to 6 students may obtain the professor's permission to receive an additional credit for participation in a practicum involving work for 4 to 6 hours per week in real world law reform advocacy in a field related to the course.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not have previously taken Law 995 (Family Law Theory, Policy and Practice)
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Family Law
Course Number: 0568
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
The role of the family and its connection with the legal system is considered, including the law pertaining to marriage, annulment, divorce, support and maintenance of the wife, children and other relatives, separation agreements, child custody, guardianship, status of wife, business transactions, property rights of husband and wife and intervention of the legal system in family affairs.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Family Law Theory, Policy & Practice
Course Number: 0995
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This writing seminar is designed to investigate the available theories for facilitating “family transition” through the process of separation or divorce and evaluate the extent to which the current practice by lawyers, courts, and related professionals facilitates or undermines successful transitions. There will be a particular focus on families with children and low income or moderate income families, and will include judicial as well as alternative dispute resolution techniques. Students will consider both economic issues following separation and divorce as well as child custody issues. Students will be required to work in teams to develop a research plan and produce individual scholarly written work that encompasses the following areas of research: 1) Identifying legal, psychological, and sociological theories concerning family transition that focus on reducing risks for all family members associated with separation and divorce, 2) “Real world” research that maps and evaluates the resources available to separating and divorcing families, including legal, mental health, court, and alternative dispute resolution procedures in the five county Southeastern Pennsylvania area, 3) Identification of key policymakers that would be in a position to implement policy proposals. Students will be encouraged to share their research findings with key policymakers.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 568 (Family Law), or Law 445 (Family Law: Custody), or Law 455 (Family Law: Economics of Divorce).
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
Course Title: Federal Courts and Jurisdiction
Course Number: 0542
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course analyzes the constitutional and statutory contours of procedure and jurisdiction in the United States courts. Course materials address the role of federal courts in protecting federal rights and supervising state governments. Topics may include justiciability (including doctrines of standing, mootness, ripeness and political questions); congressional control of jurisdiction; legislative or Article I courts; federal questions; federal common law; diversity jurisdiction; supplemental jurisdiction; state sovereign immunity under the Eleventh Amendment; habeas corpus; civil rights suits under 42 U.S.C. 1983; and abstention.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Federal Criminal Law
Course Number: 0647
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course will examine the structure of federal law enforcement, the scope of federal criminal law and techniques for limiting federal criminal authority. It will address the problems of fraud and political corruption and specifically examine the crime of mail fraud, violation[s] of the Hobbs Act and examine official bribery. The course will include an examination of drug trafficking and money laundering. Group and organizational crime will be addressed through examination of conspiracy and the racketeer influenced and corrupt organizations statute. As time permits, students may also examine federal sentencing guidelines and forfeiture provisions.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 410 (Criminal Law I)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Federal Criminal Practice: Federal Defender
Course Number: 0717
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: This simulated course develops trial advocacy skills in the context of the federal criminal justice system with specific emphasis on the criminal trial. Students will be exposed to all elements of clinical education: instruction, observation, participation, simulation, and critique and to every stage of criminal litigation from initial court appearance to jury trials. Students will also attend a technology demonstration and training seminar on Trial Director/Sanctions or other available computer assisted litigation programs for use at trial. On many class days, simulations of pretrial hearings and non-jury trials are conducted in the United States Courthouse at 6th and Market Streets. We will be working very closely with the Federal Criminal Practice Clinical Program at the Office of the United States Attorney. Each student from both programs may have opportunities to assume the roles of defense attorney and prosecutor. Instructors from both classes act as judges and critique students from both clinical programs after each simulation. Students are also given opportunities to observe actual pretrial hearings and trials in progress. Special emphasis is placed on attending opening statements and closing arguments in jury trials in a variety of federal prosecutions. The final simulation is a complete jury trial held in a courtroom of the United States Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Note: Students may not register for both #717 Federal Criminal Practice: Federal Defender and the clinical #724 Federal Criminal Practice: United States Attorney. Time Requirements: Full day Fridays (9:30 am-4 pm with a one-hour lunch break). Toward the end of the semester, students will be required to participate in a simulated jury trial in the United States Courthouse. On that day, class hours will be 1-8:30 pm.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 532 Criminal Procedure I, Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better), Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Federal Criminal Practice: Health Care Fraud
Course Number: 0728
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
See Clinicals under Academics on the Law School web site for course description.
Pre-requisites:
See Clinical Programs web page
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Course Title: Federal Criminal Practice: United States Attorney
Course Number: 0724
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: This simulated course develops prosecutorial trial advocacy skills in the context of the federal criminal justice system, with emphasis on the federal criminal trial. Students will be exposed to all elements of clinical education: instruction, observation, participation, simulation, and critique, and to every stage of criminal litigation from initial court appearance to jury trials. Students will also attend a technology demonstration and training seminar on Trial Director/Sanctions or other available computer assisted litigation programs for use at trial. On many class days simulations of pretrial hearings, plea bargaining, and non-jury trials are conducted in the United States Courthouse at 6th and Market Streets. We will be working very closely with the Federal Criminal Practice Clinical Program at the Office of the Federal Defender. Instructors from both classes act as judges and critique students from both clinical programs after each simulation. Students are also given opportunities to observe actual pretrial hearings and trials in progress. Special emphasis is placed on attending opening statements and closing arguments in jury trials in a variety of federal prosecutions. The final simulation is a complete jury trial held in a courtroom of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Note: Students may not register for both #724 Federal Criminal Practice: United States Attorney and the clinical #717 Federal Criminal Practice: Federal Defender. Time Requirements: Full day Fridays. Toward the end of the semester, students will be required to participate in a simulated jury trial in the United States Courthouse. On that day, class hours will be 1-8:30 pm.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 532 Criminal Procedure I, Law 540 Evidence (Grade of C or better), Law 460 Trial Advocacy I or Law 558 Introduction to Trial Advocacy
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: Federal Judicial Clerkship
Course Number: 0726
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Course Description: Temple Law School is proud to offer a unique clinical program in the Philadelphia area - the Federal Judicial Clerkship (FJC) Honors Clinical Course. In this clinical program, third year day and fourth year evening/part-time day students are afforded an opportunity to work for federal judges for the entire academic year and participate in the practical aspects of jurisprudence. Working with the judges and their full-time clerks, students draft orders, research issues, prepare bench memoranda, and observe judicial proceedings. Students are expected to spend approximately 8-10 hours a week in chambers. Depending on the judge's needs, students occasionally may be assigned additional work or asked to schedule their chambers hours on certain days. The Honorable Lawrence F. Stengel conducts the classroom component for this course. The classroom sessions will focus on current issues impacting the federal courts. This seminar meets Wednesday mornings. This program is prestigious and selection is determined by a committee of law school faculty and administrators. Should you be selected, you will be matched with a federal judge or magistrate. Participating judges include those located in Philadelphia, Camden, and Easton. Philadelphia and Camden judges are easily reached by car or public transportation. Easton requires access to a car. Although the application allows you to designate certain preferences, it is our strict policy that judges cannot pick students and students cannot select their judges. A student’s application communicates a willingness to participate. Students will not be permitted to drop this clinic once they are selected. Note that students may not work for any other agency or law firm during the academic year.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisites: Law 540 Evidence (grade of C or better), Minimum Cumulative GPA of 2.0, Minimum of 53 credits by the Fall Semester; Note that Introduction to Trial Advocacy (Law 558) or Trial Advocacy I and II (Law 460/461) are not required but are prefer
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Skills
Notes:
Students must enroll in this clinical for the entire year. This clinical is listed for information purposes - registration for clinical courses is handled through a separate process from regular course Registration.
Course Title: First Amendment
Course Number: 0963
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This course offers an in-depth examination of the protections afforded by the First Amendment.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 633 and Law 963.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Research
Notes:
This course is offered as a "hybrid" course. Most students take it as an exam course. A limited number of students may take it as a writing seminar. Request course number 633 to take this course as an exam course. Request course number 963 to take thi
Course Title: First Amendment
Course Number: 0633
Credit Hours: 1
Course Description
This course offers an in-depth examination of the protections afforded by the First Amendment.
Pre-requisites:
Prerequisite: Law 404 (Constitutional Law)
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
NOTE: Students may not register for both Law 633 and Law 963.
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Food and Drug Law
Course Number: 0546
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
The governance of interstate and intrastate commerce in foods, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices is studied. Emphasis is placed upon the effect of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act upon the research, manufacture, marketing and distribution of drugs through the regulatory activities of the federal agencies. Through illustration, case study and comparison, other articles and pertinent state laws and agencies are also considered.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Forensic Evidence, Science, and Medicine
Course Number: 1030
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
Through a Murder Mystery that unfolds during the semester, this course will explore how cases are pieced together through the collection of evidence, crime scene assessments, and forensic analysis as students create and analyze a murder book to help solve the homicide. Through real life experiences and lectures by experts in the field, this course will discuss the legal issues involved in forensics from eyewitness identification to polygraphs. Issues surrounding cause of death and the intricacies of the autopsy procedure will be discussed along with their usefulness for crime scene investigation and establishing causation in civil cases. Students will also learn how forensics and crime scene evidence combine in court, and how attorneys utilize these materials to build or defend their cases. The course topics will be reinforced through a review of some of the more famous cases such as the homicides of Nicole Simpson, Michael Jackson, and Jon Benet Ramsey. Students will see actual crime scene evidence, the human body, and autopsy procedures.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Course Title: Foundations of International Criminal Law
Course Number: 1022
Credit Hours: 3
Course Description
This is not a basic course in international criminal law (ICL), which typically examines the crimes that constitute ICL, modes of liability, characteristic defenses, the tribunals involved, and the bases for assertions of jurisdiction by those tribunals. Rather, this writing seminar previews that more systematic analysis of ICL by addressing a number of constitutive issues, which are grouped into four broad topics regarding issues of: Definition, Universalism, Criminal Responsibility, and Transitional Justice.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Serial
Notes:
Course Title: Foundations of International Criminal Law
Course Number: R467
Credit Hours:
Course Description
This is not a basic course in international criminal law (ICL), which typically examines the crimes that constitute ICL, modes of liability, characteristic defenses, the tribunals involved, and the bases for assertions of jurisdiction by those tribunals. Rather, this course previews that more systematic analysis of ICL by addressing a number of constitutive issues, which are grouped into four broad topics regarding issues of: Definition, Universalism, Criminal Responsibility, and Transitional Justice.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Franchise Law
Course Number: 0689
Credit Hours: 2
Course Description
This course will address the legal and business considerations of franchising; the role of franchising in the economy and the community; franchisor and franchisee relationships; federal and state regulation of franchise law; the disclosure and registration process; essential skill and knowledge sets in representing franchisors and franchisees; basic terms and issues in franchise agreements; intellectual property issues; antitrust issues; counseling prospective franchisors and franchisees.
Pre-requisites:
Co-requisites:
Course Equivalents:
Meets Graduation Requirements:
Notes:
Course Title: Gaming Law
Course Number: