Accounting for Lawyers
2 Credits

The course is designed to simplify the accounting process and instill confidence in students that they can handle situations where accounting and finances come into play. The course will explain the accounting process from original entry to the production of financial statements; it will critically examine evolving accounting standards and procedures; students will learn to analyze financial statements; the importance of the time value of money, and the various liabilities that will be of importance to them; and accounting problems. Finally, students will learn about accounting systems and the importance of internal control. The course is designed for students who have no previous study of accounting but who plan to engage in commercial, corporate, tax, or any legal practice where finances are an issue.

Administrative Law
3 Credits

A study of the process of lawmaking and law application by the executive departments and agencies of government and their control by the legislature and the courts. The primary emphasis is on the frequently competing goals of effective government, administrative discretion and fairness to affected parties. A part of the course is designed to give students insights into the allocation of law and policy making among executive, legislative and judicial branches. Another part focuses on administrative procedure and the various constitutional, statutory and common law underpinnings of such procedures.

Advanced Contracts: UCC and Interpretat
3 Credits

This course focuses on sophisticated commercial problems and cases, usually based on Article 2 (the Sales article) of the Uniform Commercial Code and occasionally on the Convention on the International Sales of Goods. A primary emphasis is on methods for interpreting contract provisions and the underlying statutory provisions, usually during the performance phase of contracts. The problems confronted in the course are somewhat broader than those arising in the Sales course. In addition, they often arise in transactional and counseling settings and the material lends itself to considering the role of lawyers in these situations, as distinguished from their roles as litigators. Both this and the Sales course are the easiest transition from the Contracts course in first year. Article 2 of the UCC is a subject covered by the bar exam.

Advanced Legal Writing: Effective Motion
3 Credits



Advanced Trial Advocacy (Civil)
3 Credits

This course provides an intensive examination of the theory and practice concerning the examination of witnesses and the boundaries of "Relevant Evidence" with the primary focus on selected topics of impeachment and rehabilitation. The course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the trial process system from the perspective of the courtroom lawyer, an ability to perform certain trial skills within the ambit of witness examination and an analysis of trial tactics and techniques as well as trial rules and procedures. Articles VI and IV of the Federal Rules of Evidence are studied in-depth and explored in their application to the courtroom experience.

Advanced Trial Advocacy (Criminal)
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the criminal trial process from initiation of charge through verdict. Intensive examination of case theory as it relates to all phases of the trial will be stressed. In addition to trying two complete jury trials, students will perform at preliminary hearings and motions to suppress. Special emphasis will be placed on the examination and cross examination of experts.

Advanced Trial and Litigation Strategy
3 Credits

This writing seminar provides an intensive examination of the theory and practice concerning the examination of witnesses and the boundaries of "Relevant Evidence: with the primary focus on selected topics of impeachment and rehabilitation. The seminar is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the trial process system from the perspective of the courtroom lawyer, an ability to perform certain trial skills within the ambit of witness examination and an analysis of both trial tactics and techniques as well as trial rules and procedures. Articles VI and IV of the Federal Rules of Evidence are studied in-depth and explored in their application to the courtroom experience.

Animal Law
2 Credits



Antitrust
3 Credits

The relevant federal statutes which regulate the competitive process and their interpretation by the courts are considered. Classroom discussion also covers the policy rationale for such regulation and economic conditions are examined.

Bankruptcy
3 Credits

Our basic Bankruptcy course is designed to give you a good grounding in the Bankruptcy Code and the associated law governing the enforcement of civil judgments. The course focuses on personal (rather than business) bankruptcy. It deals with the structure of the Bankruptcy Code and the costs and benefits the process represents to those who become involved with it either as debtors or as creditors. This simpler context of personal bankruptcy will allow you to absorb complex policy issues more readily than would an earlier foray into the bankruptcy of businesses. Business bankruptcy, by itself, is sufficiently complex to support its own course (Chapter 11 Reorganization) for students already versed in basic bankruptcy and corporate law.

Business Immigration Law
3 Credits

There is little or no doubt that much of the US economy is (and always has been) powered by foreign workers. Although the demand for certain types of workers may vary, we as a nation will need foreign nationals to fill important gaps in our economy. This course will examine the different ways US employers can hire workers from outside of the United States, as well as the options for foreign employers investing in or trading with the United States. It will also cover some of the ways in which particularly well-qualified foreign citizens can enter the United States without a sponsoring employer. Some of the visas to be covered include the L-1A, L-1B, H-1B, E-1, E-2, and O non-immigrant visas as well as the employment-based immigrant visa preferences. We will also review some of the obligations the hiring of non-citizen workers places on employers, and the unique legal considerations in recruiting, hiring, and promoting foreign nationals. This course will provide a brief introduction to some of these issues, providing students with the information necessary to spot them before they become problems.

Business Mergers and Acquisitions
2 Credits

The course will prepare students seeking employment as business lawyers by exploring fundamental legal issues arising in mergers and acquisitions. It will include a review of basic state code provisions relating to mergers and acquisitions using provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law ("DGCL"). The course will examine provisions of the DGCL authorizing mergers and acquisitions, evaluate instances when stockholder approval is required and assess issues arising in different deal structures and the various consequences of each, including tax issues relating to asset and stock deals and successor liability issues. Once students have a solid understanding of how deals are consummated under state law and the structural issues associated with various deal forms, the class will scrutinize certain drafting and negotiating issues arising in preliminary and final acquisition agreements and will analyze basic closing documents and study the role of business lawyers in acquisition transactions. The course also will cover fiduciary duties of board members relating to acquisitions including a board's power to thwart unwanted takeover attempts as well as a response to competing bidders.

Citizenship, Immigration and Refugee Law
3 Credits

The course provides a detailed overview of the laws which enable aliens to enter, reside in and ultimately become citizens of the United States. Among the topics discussed are: U.S. immigration policy and the limits of legislative and executive regulation of aliens, racial and geographic quotas, types of visas, arrest, detention, grounds of excludability of aliens and of waiver of excludability, political asylum and refugee admission, processing of relative and employer petitions, change of status within the U.S., administrative procedures and appeals, nationality by birth and by naturalization, revocation and expatriation.

Civil Procedure II
2 Credits

The litigation process from the pleading stage through appellate review is thoroughly studied. Areas covered in detail include: pleading, complex multi-party litigation (class actions, necessary parties, inter-pleader, intervention, multi-district litigation); discovery practice; pre-trial conference; trial and post-trial procedures; fundamentals of appellate review, securing and enforcing judgments; and problems of judicial administration.

Civil Procedure II
3 Credits

The litigation process from the pleading stage through appellate review is thoroughly studied. Areas covered in detail include: pleading, complex multi-party litigation (class actions, necessary parties, inter-pleader, intervention, multi-district litigation); discovery practice; pre-trial conference; trial and post-trial procedures; fundamentals of appellate review, securing and enforcing judgments; and problems of judicial administration.

Climate Change Law and Policy
3 Credits

Global climate change is threatening to cause severe, widespread and possibly catastrophic changes to our planet. This seminar will consider the implications of climate change for domestic and international law and policy. International negotiations are scheduled to take place in Copenhagen in December 2009, climate change legislation is pending in Congress, and the EPA is poised to begin regulation of greenhouse gases under existing law. How should such legislation be designed in order to accomplish the radical restructuring of the U.S. economy that will be necessary in order shift energy production away from our current heavy reliance on fossil fuels? Should it employ a carbon tax, a cap-and-trade system, or some other regulatory mechanism? How should the costs of transitioning to the new “green economy” be allocated? Should the poor receive subsidies to offset rising energy costs? How might an international agreement to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions be structured to be both politically feasible and fair? Should such an agreement impose costly emissions reduction obligations on developing nations that are already struggling economically, when the problem has been primarily caused by those in the developed world? Who should pay the costs of adapting to those adverse effects of climate change that have already become inevitable—effects that are likely to fall most heavily on the developing world? In the absence of a unified regulatory approach at either the federal (U.S.) or international level, how have advocates already begun to use existing legal structures to try to force action on climate change? We will address these and other questions in the seminar with the help of readings drawn primarily from books and scholarly articles. Students will write a series of short papers over the course of the semester based on the readings and will take an active role in facilitating class discussions.

Commercial Litigation Strategy
2 Credits

The course includes case studies of categories of litigation and the types of relief that plaintiffs seek, including damages, injunctive relief, declaratory judgments, and class actions. Experienced litigators will be guest speakers. Students will be expected to read cases assigned and participate in class discussions. Generally, each class will have two separate segments. One segment will be discussion of the cases from the assigned reading, generally led by one of the students, subject to advance assignment. The discussion will focus on the contentions by counsel and the court’s decision, with an emphasis on strategic objectives and alternatives. The second segment will discuss a general litigation topic, usually with a guest speaker. There is no exam. The grade will be based on class participation (20%), one short paper (20%), and one long paper (60%).

Conflict of Laws
3 Credits

This course studies problems of jurisdiction and choice of law arising from our federalist system of government. The course emphasizes conflicts among state laws governing daily transactions as well as principles governing enforcement of state judgments. The course may also investigate issues implicating the Erie doctrine and federal common law.

Constitutional Law and Foreign Policy
2 Credits

This course explores the relationships of selected principles of constitutional law and adjudication with the conduct of U.S. foreign policy; especially from World War II to the present.

Constitutional Law and Foreign Policy
3 Credits

This course explores the relationships of selected principles of constitutional law and adjudication with the conduct of U.S. foreign policy; especially from World War II to the present.

Consumer Law and Litigation
2 Credits

Through lecture, class discussion and case problems, this course will examine federal and state statutes, regulations and judicial decisions governing consumer financial transactions. The primary focus will be on the litigation of disputes in this area. Significant attention will be paid to the emerging problem of theft of credit identity. The course will be permeated with actual consumer problems and contracts, with emphasis throughout upon case strategy and the impact of federal procedure on gaining advantage in litigation. Time will be devoted to trial issues that arise in a consumer case, especially with regard to voir dire and opening statements.

Corporate Reorganization: Chapter 11 Ba
2 Credits

Problems related to the reorganization under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code of financially stressed corporations are considered.

Corporate Taxation
3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the taxation of corporations and their shareholders. It examines the concept of a corporation for tax purposes, corporate formations, debt versus equity, dividends and distributions, penalty taxes on undistributed income, redemptions and partial liquidations, Section 306 stock, liquidations, collapsibility, reorganizations, corporate divisions, affiliated corporations and corporate tax attributes.

Corporations
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the law and policy governing corporations. Corporations are legally created entities designed to facilitate accumulation of large amounts of capital (that is money and other things of value). They do so primarily by offering investors the opportunity of a financial return on their investment, without the requirement to undertake financial risk (above the amount invested) or responsibility for managing the enterprise. Thus, corporations permit passive investment and the separation of ownership and control. Most of the law governing corporations are designed to regulate the relationships between owners (equity investors) and managers and to provide rules to govern managers in the exercise of power over actions of the company.

Corruption Law and Policy
2 Credits

This course will examine the phenomenon of public corruption. We will use recent and current corruption prosecutions -- from federal officials and lobbyists in Washington to local public officials and employees in the region -- as the focal point for discussion of the nature of public corruption, its costs, and efforts to combat or curtail it. Much of our focus will be on enforcement tools, including both relevant federal criminal statutes and investigatory techniques. The reading materials for this course will be reported decisions, law review articles, newspaper reports, indictments, briefs, and other court records from relevant cases.

Criminal Law II
3 Credits

This course examines several aspects of substantive criminal law not covered extensively in Criminal Law I. Some of these subjects involve the interplay of substantive criminal law with constitutional issues, with evidentiary issues, and with procedural concerns -- all of which can better be brought to bear in an advanced course. Possible topics includes: limitations on what conduct should be criminalized; proportionality and legality limits; group criminality (advanced concepts involving corporate liability and conspiracy); exculpatory defenses based on mental illness and more recently developed defenses; entrapment; and an extensive examination of selected crimes such as rape and the theft related offenses.

Criminal Procedure I
3 Credits

This is a basic criminal procedure course, dealing mainly with the various constitutional rules governing police conduct prior to the institution of formal court proceedings. The major focus is on the federal constitutional rights and restrictions imposed by the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments. Searches and seizures, police interrogation, identification procedures and the exclusion of evidence obtained in violation of these provisions account for a substantial portion of the course. Some additional matters are covered, including some aspects of the formal court-connected proceedings and the basic principles of habeas corpus.

Criminal Procedure II
3 Credits

Criminal Procedure II covers the main pretrial stages of criminal proceedings in felony cases, from pre-arrest to trial: prosecution decision whether to prosecute; bail and other forms of pretrial release; preliminary hearings; indicting and investigating grand jury proceedings; joinder and severance of defendants and offenses for trial; speedy trial, prompt commencement of proceedings, prompt trial statutes and rules; pretrial discovery; prosecution disclosure and preservation of exculpatory evidence; defense obligations not to conceal inculpatory evidence; and guilty pleas proceedings, including plea bargaining. The course deals with more ""practical"" procedure than Criminal Procedure I; the constitutional provisions and appellate decisions. The class is conducted predominately through role-play simulations, but also uses more traditional case analysis (mainly U.S. Supreme Court cases) and problem solving. In the simulations, students are assigned to conduct hearings, argue motions, etc., serving as judges, attorneys and witnesses. Some of the students not assigned to perform the simulation are assigned to write on the problem.

Current Problems in Law and Medicine**
3 Credits

The goal of this course is to provide students interested in health law with a unique opportunity to conduct research on current problems being faced in the field of health law. The student will gain practical experience through exposure to health care law practitioners working on problems confronting Temple University Hospital. Using this experience to select a topic and generate ideas, the student will then conduct guided research and write a paper under the supervision of the course instructors.

Cyberlaw and Policy:Practical Applicatio
2 Credits

This course is a practical and concrete course applying Cyberlaw to pseudo-clients in legal practice. Legal and policy principles are studied that should be included in an acceptable use of electronic communications and technology policy. Included are the legal aspects of Internet, computer and information technology such as cyberprivacy, cybersecurity, commercial disparagement and defamation, cybercrimes, computer forensics, e-business, electronic issues. Students will be expected to prepare an acceptable use policy that is usable for a private corporation or public entity.

Cyberspace
3 Credits

The goal of this course is to introduce students, by means of a series of specific case studies chosen to illustrate the clash between existing legal regimes and new technologies, to a reasonably comprehensive subset of the legal problems that are being addressed as part of the developing ""online law."" Topics to be covered include the law of copyright as applied to electronic information, trademark law as applied to Internet ""domain names,"" application of the First Amendment to the regulation of Internet communications, privacy concerns on the Internet, the law of anonymous communication and the regulation of encryption technology, and the difficult international jurisdictional questions presented by Internet activity.

Death Penalty
3 Credits

This writing seminar will explore the law administering the death penalty in the United States. Four papers [one a month] of 7-10 pages will explore students' personal reactions to legalization of the death penalty, issues of racism, over inclusion, resources, effective assistance, retardation, youthful offenders and post conviction limitations on seeking relief.

Deriviative Securities and Regulation
3 Credits

Derivative Securities & Their Regulation: This seminar provides an overview of what derivative securities are; how they are designed, risk-managed, and traded; how banks, corporations, insurance companies, pension plans, and other institutional investors can utilize derivative securities to enhance their profits or control risks; and how derivative securities are and can be regulated. This seminar analyzes legal aspects of an estimated $600 trillion notional OTC (Over-The-Counter), or privately negotiated, derivative securities market. Some blame derivative securities for causing or at least contributing to recent economic crises. Topics covered include CDOs (Collateralized Debt Obligations), complexity, credit derivative securities, hedging, knowledgeable traders, noise traders, speculation, swaps, systemic risk, unsophisticated traders, and various regulatory proposals to reform our financial services industry. No prior familiarity with or knowledge of derivative securities is assumed or necessary.

Drafting and Negotiating Real Estate Doc
2 Credits

This course, taught by two experienced practitioners, will study the skills necessary to effectively negotiate real estate transactions and to draft the related documents. Working in small groups, students will have the opportunity to develop those skills by negotiating a commercial real estate lease and by drafting the key elements of the lease and the ancillary documents.

E-Discovery
2 Credits

With computers and e-mail dominating business and personal life, the nature of civil discovery has changed. Lawyers need to know how to request, identify, preserve, collect, process, review and produce digital information, in all its myriad of forms (from e-mail and Excel to social media and the "Cloud"). While this does not require a technical degree, there are significant pitfalls that lawyers can learn to avoid and better represent their clients. This class is designed to teach law students about the nuances of the quickly evolving world of e-discovery and provide practical help so that students can be immediately valuable to their employers and clients.

Education Law
3 Credits

This course surveys a range of legal issues affecting children in our nation’s elementary and secondary schools, with considerable emphasis on policy and on problems of equal educational opportunity. Topics include the differing legal frameworks applicable to public, private and religious schools; the right, if there is one, to a quality education; issues of racial and class disparity; the education of students with disabilities, English language learners, and others with special needs; freedom of expression in schools; school discipline; and school finance equity.

Election Law
2 Credits

Elections in the United States are largely governed by state law and, in a few instances, local law. However, there is a body of federal law, deriving from the Constitution and a number of federal statutes, that establishes rule rules for the conduct of elections. It is not possible, nor is it likely to be helpful, to review the vast array of state and local laws that govern most of the American electoral system. This course is therefore largely devoted to the federal law aspects that create the sometimes dense, sometimes porous framework for the conduct of American elections. Special attention is given to the constitutional aspects of federal election law as defined by the Supreme Court and, occasionally, by lower courts; but in several sections of the course there is attention to federal statutes and regulations. At a conceptual level, the course also inquires about the nature of representation and what inferences for election law might be drawn from different concepts of representation.

Emerging Trends in Labor Law
3 Credits

This seminar will examine recent developments in labor law, most of which are occurring in the shadow of the classic NLRA regime. Among other topics, we will likely study workers’ efforts to organize via privately-negotiated recognition agreements; state and local governments’ efforts to promote or deter collective bargaining; and the particular challenges faced by immigrant and other non-traditional workers. Throughout, we will also consider the broader constitutional and economic issues raised by such developments, and will ask how labor law should adapt to modern workplaces more generally.

Employment Discrimination
2 Credits

The course covers race, sex, age and handicap discrimination in employment. The historical antecedents to modern discriminatory practices and early 19th and 20th century legislative and judicial efforts to curb discriminatory practices are studied, as well as the various federal statutes and Executive Orders establishing non-discrimination and affirmative action obligations and the source of congressional and executive authority to prescribe these rules. Also covered are the non-discrimination obligations imposed by and the affirmative action activity permitted by the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution and other relevant constitutional issues, including those arising under the Tenth and Eleventh Amendments.

Employment Discrimination
3 Credits

The course covers race, sex, age and handicap discrimination in employment. The historical antecedents to modern discriminatory practices and early 19th and 20th century legislative and judicial efforts to curb discriminatory practices are studied, as well as the various federal statutes and Executive Orders establishing non-discrimination and affirmative action obligations and the source of congressional and executive authority to prescribe these rules. Also covered are the non-discrimination obligations imposed by and the affirmative action activity permitted by the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution and other relevant constitutional issues, including those arising under the Tenth and Eleventh Amendments.

Employment Law
3 Credits

This course explores, in a manner suitable for non-specialists, issues of employer-employee relations in nonunionized settings. It supplements existing courses by examining problems such as: wrongful discharge and employment-at-will at common law; fair labor standards including minimum wages and maximum hours; comparable worth and equal pay; industrial accidents and occupational safety and health; income security, unemployment compensation and pension protection; employment discrimination; employees' rights in areas such as drug testing, lie detectors, privacy, whistle blowing; plant closings, job retraining, status of aliens and employer-employee cooperation.

Entertainment Law
2 Credits

This course deals with selected legal issues which affect persons active in various aspects of the entertainment industry. These include pertinent contract, copyright, business association, securities regulation, communications and tax law issues. Special emphasis is given to the theater and to the recording and television industries.

Ethical Perspectives on the Practice of
3 Credits

This course challenges the view that a lawyer is merely an instrument for achieving his or her client's ends and then examines the relationship between professional roles and ordinary morality. We ask whether the lawyer must take personal moral responsibility for (a) the quality of his or her relationship with the client, (b) the outcome of the cases s/he handles, and (c) the tactics and the strategies used to achieve the outcome. This is a serial paper writing seminar. NOTE: This course is not a substitute for Professional Responsibility and may be taken before or after that required course. This course may not be taken until after the mandated First Year Program has been completed.

Family Law
3 Credits

The role of the family and its connection with the legal system is considered, including the law pertaining to marriage, annulment, divorce, support and maintenance of the wife, children and other relatives, separation agreements, child custody, guardianship, status of wife, business transactions, property rights of husband and wife and intervention of the legal system in family affairs.

Family Law: Theory, Policy and Practice
3 Credits

This course is designed to investigate the available theories for facilitating “family transition” through the process of separation or divorce and evaluate the extent to which the current practice by lawyers, courts, and related professionals facilitates or undermines successful transitions. There will be a particular focus on families with children and low income or moderate income families, and will include judicial as well as alternative dispute resolution techniques. Students will consider both economic issues following separation and divorce as well as child custody issues. Students will be required to work in teams to develop a research plan and produce individual scholarly written work that encompasses the following areas of research: Identifying legal, psychological, and sociological theories concerning family transition that focus on reducing risks for all family members associated with separation and divorce. “Real world” research that maps and evaluates the resources available to separating and divorcing families, including legal, mental health, court, and alternative dispute resolution procedures in the five county Southeastern Pennsylvania area. Identification of key policymakers that would be in a position to implement policy proposals. Students will be encouraged to share their research findings with key policymakers.

Federal Courts and Jurisdiction
3 Credits

This course analyzes the constitutional and statutory contours of procedure and jurisdiction in the United States courts. Course materials address the role of federal courts in protecting federal rights and supervising state governments. Topics may include justiciability (including doctrines of standing, mootness, ripeness and political questions); congressional control of jurisdiction; legislative or Article I courts; federal questions; federal common law; diversity jurisdiction; supplemental jurisdiction; state sovereign immunity under the Eleventh Amendment; habeas corpus; civil rights suits under 42 U.S.C. 1983; and abstention.

First Amendment
2 Credits

This course offers an in-depth examination of the protections afforded by the First Amendment.

First Amendment
3 Credits

This course offers an in-depth examination of the protections afforded by the First Amendment.

Gaming Law
2 Credits

This course will explore the constitutional and statutory basis for gaming; the regulatory structure to license and control gaming; legal issues involving Indian, shipboard, charitable and internet gaming; and the rights of patrons and licensees who frequent and work in casinos.

Gaming Law
3 Credits



Habeas Corpus
2 Credits

This course will introduce students to the practice of habeas corpus before United States District Courts and Courts of Appeals pursuant to 28 U.S. Code § 2254 (state prisoners) and § 2255 (federal prisoners). Students will have the opportunity to attend a federal habeas court proceeding (schedule permitting) and to meet with United States Magistrate Judges, who submit reports and recommendation on habeas corpus matters to United States District Court Judges.

Health Care Law: Bioethics
2 Credits

This course examines bioethics as it applies to health care problems. Representative topics are: definitions of life and death; organ and tissue transplants; procreation problems; genetic counseling; abortion; sterilization; in vitro fertilization; surrogate parenting; wrongful birth and wrongful life; life and death decisions and medical experiments with human subjects.

Health Care Law: Bioethics
3 Credits

This course examines bioethics as it applies to health care problems. Representative topics are: definitions of life and death; organ and tissue transplants; procreation problems; genetic counseling; abortion; sterilization; in vitro fertilization; surrogate parenting; wrongful birth and wrongful life; life and death decisions and medical experiments with human subjects.

Health Care Law: Medical Malpractice
2 Credits

This course examines the professional responsibility of physicians and other health care providers. Representative topics are: the professional patient relationship; quality control and risk management; standards of care; defense to malpractice actions; hospital patient responsibility; manufacturer patient responsibility; tort reform; medical evidence and damages.

Health Care Law: Medical Malpractice
3 Credits

This writing seminar examines the professional responsibility of physicians and other health care providers. Representative topics are: the professional patient relationship; quality control and risk management; standards of care; defense to malpractice actions; hospital patient responsibility; manufacturer patient responsibility; tort reform; medical evidence and damages.

International Commercial Mediation and A
2 Credits

This course focuses on the law and practice of international commercial arbitration, including the creation and operation of international arbitration tribunals as well as the role of nations in compelling, facilitating, and enforcing arbitral awards. Special attention will be given to issues involving jurisdiction, choice of law, arbitration clauses in international transactions, presentation of cases before arbitral tribunals, cases on arbitrations and the relationship between international arbitration and court systems.

International Criminal Law
3 Credits

Recent years have seen a rapid expansion in the international law dealing with atrocity crimes such as genocide and crimes against humanity as well as crimes committed in armed conflict. This course will study the evolution of international criminal law from Nuremberg to the present. The goals of the course are (1) to provide an overview of the main doctrines of international criminal law and procedure, including the definitions of crimes, modes of responsibility, and principles of procedure and punishment; and (2) to explore the advantages and disadvantages of prosecuting crimes of mass violence in national, international, and "hybrid" courts.

International Development Law and Policy
3 Credits

This seminar examines high priority areas in international development aid and the legal issues that arise in connection with them. We begin with a discussion of the meaning of development and the role of governments, international organizations, civil society and the private sector in development. We then examine the legal and policy aspects of development in the context of specific needs, such as HIV AIDS, education, the environment and microfinance. We focus, particularly, on the legal questions that arise in building collaborations between donors of international development aid to address these needs and the different legal instruments used to provide such aid. No prior knowledge of development or development law is required.

International Financial Law
3 Credits

This course will focus primarily on the legal aspects of international capital markets but will also include an introduction to the basics of project finance. No prior knowledge of finance is required.

International Health Law
2 Credits

This course examines the many treaties, institutions and customs that govern how health is protected and promoted in the international system. Specific topics will include communicable disease control (e.g., SARS), chronic disease control (Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), international human rights and health, access to medicines (e.g., the TRIPS Agreement), the institutional structure of global health governance (World Health Organization, Global AIDS Fund), and health-related business regulation.

International Health Law
3 Credits

This course examines the many treaties, institutions and customs that govern how health is protected and promoted in the international system. Specific topics will include communicable disease control (e.g., SARS), chronic disease control (Framework Convention on Tobacco Control), international human rights and health, access to medicines (e.g., the TRIPS Agreement), the institutional structure of global health governance (World Health Organization, Global AIDS Fund), and health-related business regulation.

International Intellectual Property
3 Credits

Once thought of as a “niche” course taught in a few law schools, international intellectual property is rapidly becoming a staple of law school’s intellectual property curriculum. International Intellectual Property is in many ways similar to, and in many ways different than, the United States’ intellectual property law. International intellectual property is similar because the same intellectual property regimes, namely, copyrights, trademarks, patents, and trade secrets, are involved. Thus, many of the same underlying principles and theories seen in the U.S. intellectual property course are also observed in the international context. This is not unexpected as various other countries’ intellectual property laws are similar to if not based on the U.S. laws.

International Investment and Trade Polic
3 Credits

This course focuses on the law of international investments and trade policy and covers the nature of the international investment transaction and the various forms of regulation thereof. The course will also consider national governmental policies dealing with trade and the restriction thereof.

International Law Colloquium
3 Credits

This course will examine select advanced topics in contemporary international law practice and scholarship. Approximately every other week, the course will feature scholarly presentations of papers or works-in-progress by leading international law scholars. Students will submit written critiques of the scholars' papers. This course satisfies the serial writing requirement.

International Organizations
3 Credits

This course examines the legal character of the United Nations and a variety of other international and regional organizations including the International Labor Organization, the International Monetary Fund, the Organization of American States and the Organization of African Unity. Relevant decisions of the International Court of Justice and of municipal courts are studies as well as basic documents.

Introduction to Public Interest Law
3 Credits

In this course, we will examine whether courts can be utilized as engines for institutional and/or societal reform. At the outset (in Weeks I-III) we will seek to define what public interest law is, the fiscal and other constraints under which these lawyers labor as well as the various models that have arisen in the public interest sector. We will then turn (in Weeks V and VI) to an examination of Professor Gerald Rosenberg's The Hollow Hope in which he sets out a theory concerning whether and under what circumstances the courts can be utilized for social engineering purposes. In the remaining weeks, we will then undertake a series of case studies concerning gay rights, the rights of prisoners, the rights of foster children and citizens confronting police abuse in order to respond to Professor Rosenberg's theses. Throughout the course (at Weeks IV, VIII and XII) the students will have an opportunity to meet and dialogue with public interest practitioners. These individuals will be encouraged not only to share substantive legal information pertaining to their areas of expertise, but also to give the students an opportunity to discuss career development in this area of the law. Finally, students will be required to complete a research paper utilizing the concepts developed in class and applying them to the legal efforts of desegregation, disability, abortion, voting rights, or other areas of interest.

Introduction To Trial Advocacy
3 Credits

Armed with the prerequisite, Evidence, this course introduces the student to the law of trial advocacy. "In a ""learning by doing"" or student performance format," students are taught the basic trial advocacy skills of making and meeting objections, direct and cross examination, introducing and opposing exhibits, impeachment of witnesses, examination of experts, and delivering opening statements and closing arguments. Students are placed in performance sections which are capped at 12 and attend a weekly lecture or demonstration geared to the weekly assignment. Students must sign up for both a two-hour performance section and the one-hour lecture section. Successful completion of ITA meets the advocacy requirement for clinicals.

Jurisprudence
3 Credits

This writing seminar will explore the Natural Law and Natural Rights traditions in Western Thought.

Juvenile Justice
2 Credits

The juvenile justice system, its history, philosophical basis and strengths and deficiencies, including procedures at intake, pretrial detention, adjudication and disposition. Delinquency and PINS are emphasized. Battered child syndrome is studied as a prototypical example of child neglect.

Labor Law
3 Credits

The employment relationship in a unionized context is examined. Strikes, picketing, secondary boycotts, injunctions and employer and union unfair labor practices are studied. The National Labor Relations Board's function as an administrative agency is emphasized.

Land Use Planning
3 Credits

Land use law focusing on zoning, including the traditional elements such as spot zoning, variances, special exceptions, planned unit developments, as well as the emerging law of exclusionary zoning, zoning to control perceived undesirable uses of land such as adult book stores played off against First Amendment rights, damage actions under Sec. 1983 for land use decisions by local government, subdivision process and substance, eminent domain and some emphasis on historic preservation, private land use controls such as covenants and easements and nuisance principles.

Law of Electronic Commerce
2 Credits

This course will focus on key issues confronting businesses as they migrate to an electronic environment. The course will examine the problems confronting the application of existing law to on-line commerce and then explore possible solutions to those problems. Authentication and integrity issues in cyberspace, electronic contracting, click wrap contracting, warranty liability in cyberspace, controlling the use of information in cyberspace, electronic payment models, marketing on the Internet, data security and privacy issues, data mining - using customer information/lists, social networking and e-commerce, protection of intellectual property rights, raising capital in high-tech businesses, taxation of electronic commerce and negotiability in electronic commerce are examples of topics that (time permitting) will be covered. The course will be “reality based”: students will get hands-on experience with actual contracts and other materials in this field.

Law, Science and Technology
3 Credits

We will explore the interrelationship between law, science and technology and the role of science and technology in law by examining a series of specific problems. Examples include the legal ramifications of recent technological developments such as polygraph testing, clinical testing of new treatments on human subjects, cable television and the newest vehicle for mass communications, Internet, and fiber optics. Another issue that will be explored is the influence of new statistical and mathematical methods on the law. Students write and make a presentation to the class on a topic of their choosing.

Legal Research and Writing III: Advanced
3 Credits

This course will focus on advanced strategies for persuasion in legal writing. The reading in the course will focus on materials about the theory and practice of persuasion in law and other disciplines. The course will touch on such topics as storytelling and narrative, rhetorical devices, scientific advances in persuasion, and framing. Students will evaluate the use of the studied techniques in legal briefs and will practice using the techniques in their own writing.

Legal, Professional and Business Aspects
2 Credits

No matter in what setting one practices law, all lawyers need to understand the economics and ethics of law practice as well as the legal principles controlling different aspects of one’s practice. By focusing on the practice management aspect of law itself and the complex issues it implicates, this course aims to equip students with the skills to successfully begin their careers, no matter what the setting. Through lecture, discussion and problem solving, “Legal, Professional and Business Aspects of Law Practice” will introduce students to “life in a law firm” through the following concepts: Economics of Law PracticeTime Management Client DevelopmentEthics of PracticeEach of these four general areas will receive roughly equal treatment during the course. In addition, the ethics component will overlay the other three areas in order to describe how the Rules of Professional Conduct govern the provision of legal services. This course will follow a format adapted from a successful course at another law school. Temple students will work in “law firms” of several students. These “firms” will be of various sizes and types of practice. Each “firm” will develop its structure and organization, and two-year financial projections, staffing patterns, administrative and management plans, practice systems, and marketing and business development strategies and tactics. Students will complete projects based on challenges that today’s law firms and law departments face, such as analyzing software for law firms, conducting management audits, creating Web sites and other materials, drafting law office policy manuals, responding to risk management issues and the like. Students will present their projects to the entire class for discussion and critique. Given these ambitions, class size will necessarily be limited. Class sessions will include guest presentations by law firm leaders and law management and marketing experts who will discuss issues within their areas of expertise and work with students on real-world problems. This approach will help prepare students for the practical aspects of law practice today.

Legislation
3 Credits

Aspects of the legislative process most significant for the practicing lawyer are considered. The course begins with introductory materials on the structure and function of the legislative process as compared and contrasted with the judicial process. The bulk of the course is devoted to a thorough examination of the main approaches to statutory interpretation: statutory text; legislative intent; purpose and contexts as revealed in legislative history; and the canons of statutory construction. The topics of judicial deference to administrative interpretation and clear statement rules will also be thoroughly canvassed.

Low Income Taxpayer Policy & Practice
3 Credits

This course enables students to see first hand the effect tax policies have on low income taxpayers and then to process that experience through the lens of existing tax policy scholarship and commentary. Students will become certified as a volunteer preparers for VITA, the IRS's Volunteer Income Tax Assistance project, and will volunteer at a VITA center for a minimum of 4 hours per week during the last week of January, all 4 weeks of February, and two weeks in April. Class will meet once per week for 3 weeks in January, at least 2 weeks in February, 2 weeks in March, and 3 weeks in April. Students will be required to keep a journal in which they will describe the salient aspects of the returns they help to prepare. In addition, students will prepare a paper, not to exceed 6,000 words, in which they analyze their experience, taking into account the policy literature examined in class, and make recommendations for change. Students will present the ideas for their papers to the class and willlead a discussion thereof. The paper will not satisfy any portion of the law school's writing requirement. With prior approval, two or more students may choose to collaborate on the final paper, which has the potential to generate deeper, more meaningful papers. The grade for the course will reflect a combination of the quality of the journal postings, participation in class meetings, and the final paper.

Oil & Gas Law
2 Credits

Development of natural gas from the Marcellus Shale formation has brought renewed interest in oil and gas development to Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and New York. This course will cover issues in conveying the mineral estate, relations between surface and mineral owners, relations among neighboring uses, environmental regulation at the state and federal level, local regulation and state preemption, moratoriums, considerations of cumulative impacts, and litigation.

Partnership Taxation
3 Credits

This course will survey tax issues pertaining to the formation, operations and distributions of partnerships and S corporations, with special attention to partnership allocations and liquidations.

Patent Litigation
2 Credits

This course will address the manner in which patent cases are litigated, with special emphasis on a number of special issues that frequently arise in that context. Topics to be covered include preparation and content of the complaint and answer, discovery, the role of expert witnesses, preliminary injunctions, claim construction "and the ""Markman hearing,"" proof of infringement and" damages, jury instructions, and appeals. There will be a number of hands-on exercises and a final examination.

Patent Prosecution
2 Credits

This course will focus on the legal issues that arise during the process of drafting patent applications and negotiating with patent examiners over patent validity. We will look at the prosecution history of a single successful patent application, and examine the kinds of decisions that the prosecuting attorneys were called upon to make and the ways in which questions about patent law, patent licensing, and the enforceability of patents and possible litigation concerns, help to shape the prosecution process.

Post Trial Review (Criminal Appellate Pr
2 Credits

The major focus of this course is on the procedures and rights involved in the appeal of a criminal case. (Many of these procedures are similar to those in civil cases.) Attention is given to understanding the implication of appellate rules for the trial of a case. The role of the appellate courts, as well as of appellate attorneys, is also examined. That portion of the course dealing with prosecutor appeals affords an opportunity for an extensive examination of important aspects of double jeopardy. Some brief attention also may be given to various forms of """collateral attack"" litigation and post-verdict trial" court motions.

Post Trial Review Criminal Appellate Pro
3 Credits

The major focus of this course is on the procedures and rights involved in the appeal of a criminal case. (Many of these procedures are similar to those in civil cases.) Attention is given to understanding the implication of appellate rules for the trial of a case. The role of the appellate courts, as well as of appellate attorneys, is also examined. That portion of the course dealing with prosecutor appeals affords an opportunity for an extensive examination of important aspects of double jeopardy. Some brief attention also may be given to various forms of """collateral attack"" litigation and post-verdict trial" court motions. In lieu of an examination, students taking this course as a writing seminar will research and write a series of papers. Study of the course materials and participation in classes is also part of the process.

Professional Responsibility
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to explore what it means to be an ethical lawyer by discussing a range of issues facing legal professionals while acquainting students with some of the specific guidelines for ethical professional conduct. Emphasis is on the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, ethics opinions from bar associations, common law and statutory materials. Successful completion (grade of C or better) of Professional Responsibility, either as an exam course or as a writing seminar, is required in order to graduate.

Race & Gender Issues in Corporate Law, M
3 Credits

This seminar will focus on the myriad law and business issues pertaining to how efforts toward achieving race and gender equality influence, and are influenced by, corporate law, transactional markets, and business organizations. Active participation, attendance, and the presentation of a research agenda are important to the success of the seminar. The final research paper will incorporate the use of business, economic, or statistical data when possible to enhance your theoretical paradigms or legal/policy arguments. The seminar will be divided into three broad sections: examining the impact of race and gender issues on regulated industries, markets, and public corporations, exploring government's role in achieving race and gender equality in the private sector, and the use of data analysis to support or reject claims of race and gender bias in organizations and transactional markets. Among the topics the seminar may explore: race, gender, and corporate governance; affirmative action and diversity programs; race, gender, and sub-prime lending; the history of race and gender status and salary equality in large corporations; state and local efforts to compel race and gender equality in private organizations; and the use of econometrics to prove/disprove theories of race and gender bias. Special attention will be given to the role of the EEOC, the OFCCP, and other oversight legal regimes tasked with ensuring 'fairness' in the private sector.

Real Estate Development Finance
2 Credits

This course looks at the law and economics involved in commercial real estate projects from start to finish, including an examination of some of the practical considerations inherent in the development and financing of commercial real estate.

Real Estate Development Law and Practice
2 Credits

This Course will detail the entire process of Real Estate Development from a legal perspective while reviewing the role of an attorney in the real estate development process and detailing numerous legal documents, governmental regulations, and major case law.

Real Estate Transactions
2 Credits

The essentials of land transfer with emphasis on agreement of sale, deed, title examination, rights and remedies of all parties are studied. Financing and relevant tax considerations are given limited attention.

Sales
3 Credits

This course looks at formation, performance and enforcement of contracts involving the sales of goods. Most of the course focuses on Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code but the course also touches Articles 2A, 5, and 7 of the UCC, the Convention on the International Sale of Goods (CISG) and other sources of law. Of the Uniform Commercial Code offerings, the Sales course will be the most familiar to students and builds directly on doctrine familiar to them from the first year Contracts courses.

Securities Litigation and Enforcement
3 Credits

This course surveys a broad range of materials concerning theoretical and practical aspects of complex federal securities litigation and enforcement. It addresses actions and issues as they are likely to arise in actual securities litigation, thus preparing students to represent clients in class actions securities fraud lawsuits, insider trading litigation, Securities Exchange Commission administrative proceedings and Department of Justice criminal prosecutions. This class examines a practice area of growing importance, especially since the infamous accounting and corporate governance scandals at Enron, WorldCom, and many other companies grabbed front page headlines throughout 2002-2003. This course does not presuppose that students have already taken a securities regulation course. Students who have not taken a securities regulation course are at no disadvantage because this course is designed to be accessible without any prior familiarity of securities regulations. But, in order to challenge and stimulate those students who are concurrently taking or have previously taken a securities regulations course, this course analyses conceptual subtleties, doctrinal nuances and practical issues that students are unlikely to have previously encountered in their securities regulations course. Finally, this course also provides all of the necessary financial economics background for securities litigation and enforcement in terms of an overview of capital markets efficiency and behavioral finance, which applies insights of empirical and experimental research in psychology and neuroscience to understand actual financial economic behavior.

Securities Regulation
3 Credits

Federal and state regulation of the sale, distribution and trading of securities, including an inquiry into the liabilities of officers, directors, attorneys and accountants, is studied.

Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity
3 Credits

This course will explore the relationship between the ways in which American law has responded to a variety of issues related to sexual orientation. The course will begin by examining the multiple meanings and dimensions of sexual orientation, then look at the relationships between issues of orientation and other legally protected statutes. The remainder of the course will focus on a variety of substantive areas of law in which issues of sexual orientation arise. As each substantive area is covered, students will be encouraged to reflect back on the first classes and think about whether existing legal protections for other minority groups are appropriate for sexual minorities, or whether other legal structures would be more effective in achieving the goals of equality and liberation.

Spanish for Lawyers
2 Credits

The purpose of this course is to give the Spanish speaking lawyer or law student a brief introduction to, and the ability to increase their familiarity with, legal terms in Spanish. Students will be exposed to these terms in the context of the substantive civil law in which they are utilized. This course will be conducted in the following manner. A legal document, brief article or other reading will be posted on Blackboard one week prior to our meeting. These legal documents or articles will focus on different areas of the law as practiced in Latin America. Students will be expected to read and review each weekly document prior to our meeting, where we will discuss the assignment in Spanish. This course will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The evaluation will be based on two to three writing assignments, which will involve either the drafting of a legal document in Spanish or the translation of a document in Spanish into English.

Special Education Law in the United Stat
2 Credits

This course will examine the foundation of special education in the United States; specific federal statutes that govern education of exceptional children; practical application of those statutes, specifically the importance of individualization of programming, how the procedures are designed to ensure that individualization occurs and what an appropriate IEP looks like;mechanisms for resolving disputes in special education, from informal meetings to mediation to administrative hearing to federal or state court; the policies of federal special education laws and how the laws advance (or undermine) those policies; the competing interests (parents, child, school, state, federal, administration, courts) in the special education system and how federal laws aggravate or mitigate the conflicts between these interests.

Sports Law
3 Credits

This course explores issues at the intersection of law and sport in both the amateur and professional contexts. Among other issues, the course will engage questions of liability arising from players' injuries and questions of professional responsibility faced by the lawyer-agent.

State and Local Government Law
3 Credits

The first part of the course emphasizes the scope and nature of local government powers and their relationship to state and national authority. Topics include: creation and change of local government units, Dillon's rule, home rule, preemption, and intergovernmental conflict and cooperation. The second part of the course surveys the functional powers of local government. Topics include: revenue raising, borrowing, and spending; personnel management, and tort liability. Up to one half of the final grade in this course will be based on a ten to twelve page paper selected by the student from the topics covered in the second part of the course.

Taxation
3 Credits

Every society must tax, and how and whom it taxes reflects its core values. Tax affects nearly everything you and your clients will ever do, from giving birth to dying and everything in between. Receiving damages, entering into a settlement, paying legal fees, finding money, entertaining clients, defaulting on a loan, buying office supplies, paying for education, making or receiving a gift, and even getting married are tax-sensitive events. This course will introduce you to the principles, policies and structure of the federal income tax system. You will learn who is taxed, what they are taxed on, how much they are taxed, and when they are taxed by studying both the Internal Revenue Code and the judicial and administrative pronouncements that interpret it. You will have the opportunity for detailed examination of the interaction between the three branches of government because the legislature (Congress) writes the statute, the executive (Treasury and IRS) interprets and administers it and the judiciary (the Tax Court and the Federal courts) settles disputes, often causing further legislative action and starting the cycle anew. This is NOT a course on filling out tax returns and no knowledge of higher mathematics is required.

Transitional Justice
3 Credits

This seminar will explore the legal, moral, social, and political questions that face societies emerging from periods of large-scale human rights abuses. We will study the various strategies that societies have adopted in recent history to recover from war, ethnic conflict, apartheid, and authoritarian rule. Such strategies include prosecutions, truth commissions, reparation programs, institutional reforms, and reconciliation programs. Each student will engage in a substantial research project that describes and analyzes a specific case or problem in transitional justice and explores how that case or problem fits into the larger themes examined in the course. Students will present their research to the class and will be responsible for reading and reacting to the work of their classmates.

Unincorporated Business Associations:Age
3 Credits

Most business organizations in the United States are no longer corporations, but unincorporated business associations such as sole proprietorships, partnerships, or limited liability companies (LLCs). These business forms are used by entities ranging from "mom and pop" stores to high-tech start-ups to sophisticated investment funds. This class examines these business entities, which every attorney engaged in a business practice needs to understand. After a review of agency law, the course will examine partnerships, limited partnerships (LPs), LLCs, and if time permits some less common unincorporated business forms.

Women and the Law
3 Credits

This course presents a historical panorama of the special status accorded women in the Anglo-American legal system from its earliest time through the present. Any study of a complex historical process encourages observation of the interaction between socio-cultural and legal values. Thus, students enrolled in this course will be able to examine the cybernetics of law and social policy in the particular context of women's issues. Finally, a focus on recent changes in the law respecting women provides students with the opportunity to explore the possibilities of a positive role for lawyers and the legal system in the lives of American women.

Women in the Law: Domestic Violence, Ra
3 Credits

This course will focus on woman abuse, previously labeled battered woman syndrome. It will cover the causes of woman abuse and both formal and informal societal responses. Major emphasis will be on police involvement, evidentiary rules, substantive criminal and civil law doctrine, criminal and civil procedures, and avoidance and remedial measures. Some time will be spent on historical, sociological and international materials.